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Bottega Veneta exudes 1940s Hollywood glamour in Milan

Milan Fashion Week took a formal turn on the third day of previews for next fall and winter.

Mindful of the price point, designers were not churning out looks that could be tossed into a suitcase for a fanciful journey, but rather pieces that could hang in the closet for years to come, even left alone for a period only to re-emerge as relevant as the day they were purchased.

The old debate continued about whether to get items to the store quickly to satisfy the consumer accustomed to instant gratification. But while some designers were quick to get out capsule collections, from Moschino to Ermanno Scervino, the overriding Milan mindset retained its commitment to luxury craftsmanship and materials, which cannot be rushed.

Some highlights from Saturday's shows, including Bottega Veneta, Missoni, Scervino and Jil Sander.

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HOLLYWOOD'S GOLDEN ERA AT BOTTEGA VENETA

Bottega Veneta's looks for next season exuded a 1940s Hollywood glamour, with a strictly formal collection for men and women.

The female silhouette befitted any Hollywood diva: broad shoulders, rounded hips and tailored at the waist with long continuous lines. Creative director Tomas Maier said the shape conveys "the pencil mark on a sketch."

Sweeping metallic-thread evening dresses created a liquid effect and had distinctive detailing, with one tying demurely on the derriere. Riding trousers were the staple for daywear, worn with tucked-sweaters and knee-high boots. Contemporary touches included multi-directional pleats on the daytime dresses — a technique achieved with a mostly polyester base to keep the shape — and a disciplined deployment of sequins and elegant studs. Big furry coats were from goats, a purposefully sustainable choice.

Glamorous accessories finished the looks: sheer black hose with polka dots, suede and nappa wedge footwear and crystal combs sweeping the hair into place. Colors included bright ochre and tangerine for the day and ice blue and desert rose for the evening.

Bottega Veneta's menswear also started with formal wear, with both smoking jackets that nipped in the waist and bombers paired with bow ties. Maier said the two clothing lines were conceived together, sharing materials and ideas.

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DESIGNING FOR A WORLD OF WOMEN

Despite the collection's strong point of view on Saturday, Bottega Veneta's creative director, Tomas Maier, said he had no specific muse in mind.

"I never think about one single woman. I grew up in a home with a lot of women, a lot of sisters, my mother and aunts. Everyone very different, everyone with their own personality and their own problems," Maier said backstage. "That really took me off the road of having a dream woman."

Instead, he deliberately seeks to create looks that work for women of different shapes, skin tones and hair colors.

"It is on our minds at all times," he said.

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BIRD OF PARADISE FOR VIONNET

The French brand Vionnet made its Milan runway debut Friday evening in the 15th-century Casa degli Atellani palace, recreating a salon atmosphere amid carved wooden panels and centuries-old frescoes.

"We are Made-in-Italy, and this is why we are here in Milan today," said creative director Goga Ashkenazi, who took over the historic brand in 2012. "There may be a time when we go back to Paris, but for us, it is the same. We feel very at home here."

The collection was inspired by the exotic bird-of-paradise, which Ashkenazi compared to "women of modernity" like Yoko Ono and Imam.

"They belong to the world, and they are amazingly self-confident, each one a character," she said.

Avian references appeared in encyclopedic prints on silken fabrics, while the bird-of-paradise's colorful plumage also inspired flashes of colors, including turquoise, green and pinks, which contrasted with taupe and black.

Ashkenazi captured the fluidity of the brand founded in 1912 with light chiffon and crepe de chine silks that conveyed classical Greco-Roman styles. But she kept it modern with contrasting bias-cut denim, including flowing bell bottoms, and twists on dresses that had an industrial touch, inspired by the drill. Even the shearlings hung on the body in a fluid manner.

"That was the intention, the break in styles," she said. "We are respecting our beautiful history of course, but we are giving it a twist."

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Follow Colleen Barry on Twitter: https://twitter.com/collbarry

Iranian director sends video to message to US rally

An Oscar-nominated Iranian film director has sent a video message to a rally attended by celebrities and top talent agents. It's intended to thank the Hollywood community for its support during his boycott of the awards ceremony.

After U.S. President Donald Trump issued an executive order temporarily banning immigrants from seven Muslim majority countries, including Iran, Asghar Farhadi decided to boycott the Oscars.

The video has been published on Iranian social media. In it, Farhadi condemns the new U.S. president's policies and says they are "trying to promote hate."

Farhadi said in his first public appearance since the ban: "It is comforting to me to know that, at a time when some politicians are trying to promote hate by creating divisions between cultures and religions and nationalities."

Iranian director sends video to message to US rally

An Oscar-nominated Iranian film director has sent a video message to a rally attended by celebrities and top talent agents. It's intended to thank the Hollywood community for its support during his boycott of the awards ceremony.

After U.S. President Donald Trump issued an executive order temporarily banning immigrants from seven Muslim majority countries, including Iran, Asghar Farhadi decided to boycott the Oscars.

The video has been published on Iranian social media. In it, Farhadi condemns the new U.S. president's policies and says they are "trying to promote hate."

Farhadi said in his first public appearance since the ban: "It is comforting to me to know that, at a time when some politicians are trying to promote hate by creating divisions between cultures and religions and nationalities."

Guest lineups for the Sunday news shows

Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

ABC's "This Week" — House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi of California; Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio; White House Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

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NBC's "Meet the Press" — Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark.; Gov. John Hickenlooper, D-Colo.

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CBS' "Face the Nation" — Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio; former CIA Director John Brennan.

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CNN's "State of the Union" — Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.; Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J.; Reps. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., and Ruben Gallego, D-Ariz.

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"Fox News Sunday" — Govs. Scott Walker, R-Wis., and Terry McAuliffe, D-Va.

Legend, Miranda, Bareilles make Oscar rehearsals musical

Lin-Manuel Miranda owned Friday's Oscar rehearsals. He sang a tune from "La La Land," posed like John Travolta in "Saturday Night Fever," invoked a 1990s Billy Crystal Oscar monologue, and reprimanded his dad from the stage for having his cellphone light on.

The creator of "Hamilton" joined Sting, Justin Timberlake and John Legend for a day of music rehearsals at Hollywood's Dolby Theatre Friday. Miranda is nominated for "How Far I'll Go" from "Moana." Timberlake is up for "Can't Stop the Feeling" from "Trolls." Sting will sing his nominated song from "Jim: The James Foley Story," and Legend will perform the two nominated songs from "La La Land."

Wearing a sweatshirt that read "Rehearsal is the best part," Miranda sang a few bars from "City of Stars" before his rehearsal began.

"I can't get it out of my head!" he said.

Later, he called out his dad from the stage.

"Luis Miranda," the 37-year-old Grammy, Emmy and Tony winner bellowed into the microphone. "Turn your light off. I can see it from here."

Lin-Manuel Miranda will become the youngest member of the EGOT club if he takes home the Oscar on Sunday. He's set to introduce 16-year-old Auli'i Cravalho at the show, who voiced the title character of "Moana" and will perform his nominated song.

A novice actress discovered by chance in her hometown of Honolulu, Cravalho repeatedly ran through the tune with a confidence and charm that belie her age and inexperience.

"She's literally never done this before," said Disney Animation spokeswoman Amy Astley, adding that the Friday's rehearsals represented Cravalho's first time ever onstage.

The starlet even smiled as she sang, completely undaunted until she noticed Meryl Streep's seat-saving placard in the theater's front row.

"There's my role model in life right there," Cravalho said.

She confessed her concerns to Miranda after the rehearsal. The banner-wielding dancers behind her: did they cause too much of a breeze in her hair?

"It's like a bespoke Beyonce fan," Miranda said in comfort.

Earlier Friday, Legend sat behind a grand piano on the Oscar stage. The last time he performed here, he went home with an Academy Award, winning best original song for "Glory" from "Selma."

This time, Legend rehearsed a medley of tunes he didn't write, but the composer of the nominated songs from "La La Land" was by his side to offer guidance.

Legend will perform a newly arranged medley of "City of Stars" and "Audition" by the film's triple-nominated composer, Justin Hurwitz, who kept his sheet music notes under his arm throughout Friday's rehearsal.

"It's really cool to mess up on this stage," Legend said with a smile after striking an errant chord on the piano. Hurwitz coached the Grammy winner between takes.

Set against a backdrop that moves from a Los Angeles sunset to a starry night sky, choreographer Mandy Moore led a team of dancers through a routine that evokes the timeless ballroom moves Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling perform in the film. Two dancers even appear to float through the sky during the number.

"It's gonna be good, I promise," Moore told Hurwitz.

"It looks beautiful," he said nervously.

Co-lyricist Benj Pasek watched proudly from a seat in the theater.

"I am freaking out," the 31-year-old Oscar nominee said, adding that he brought his mother along to rehearsals.

"She's becoming best friends with all the people who run the Oscars," he said.

Sara Bareilles, who will sing for the show's In Memoriam tribute, had a brief Broadway-style moment with Miranda and "Hamilton" director Tommy Kail. The stage stars attempted to present the singer with a bottle of water, which she dramatically shunned, until embracing the Tony winners seconds later.

The 89th Academy Awards will air Sunday on ABC.

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

Legend, Miranda, Bareilles make Oscar rehearsals musical

Lin-Manuel Miranda owned Friday's Oscar rehearsals. He sang a tune from "La La Land," posed like John Travolta in "Saturday Night Fever," invoked a 1990s Billy Crystal Oscar monologue, and reprimanded his dad from the stage for having his cellphone light on.

The creator of "Hamilton" joined Sting, Justin Timberlake and John Legend for a day of music rehearsals at Hollywood's Dolby Theatre Friday. Miranda is nominated for "How Far I'll Go" from "Moana." Timberlake is up for "Can't Stop the Feeling" from "Trolls." Sting will sing his nominated song from "Jim: The James Foley Story," and Legend will perform the two nominated songs from "La La Land."

Wearing a sweatshirt that read "Rehearsal is the best part," Miranda sang a few bars from "City of Stars" before his rehearsal began.

"I can't get it out of my head!" he said.

Later, he called out his dad from the stage.

"Luis Miranda," the 37-year-old Grammy, Emmy and Tony winner bellowed into the microphone. "Turn your light off. I can see it from here."

Lin-Manuel Miranda will become the youngest member of the EGOT club if he takes home the Oscar on Sunday. He's set to introduce 16-year-old Auli'i Cravalho at the show, who voiced the title character of "Moana" and will perform his nominated song.

A novice actress discovered by chance in her hometown of Honolulu, Cravalho repeatedly ran through the tune with a confidence and charm that belie her age and inexperience.

"She's literally never done this before," said Disney Animation spokeswoman Amy Astley, adding that the Friday's rehearsals represented Cravalho's first time ever onstage.

The starlet even smiled as she sang, completely undaunted until she noticed Meryl Streep's seat-saving placard in the theater's front row.

"There's my role model in life right there," Cravalho said.

She confessed her concerns to Miranda after the rehearsal. The banner-wielding dancers behind her: did they cause too much of a breeze in her hair?

"It's like a bespoke Beyonce fan," Miranda said in comfort.

Earlier Friday, Legend sat behind a grand piano on the Oscar stage. The last time he performed here, he went home with an Academy Award, winning best original song for "Glory" from "Selma."

This time, Legend rehearsed a medley of tunes he didn't write, but the composer of the nominated songs from "La La Land" was by his side to offer guidance.

Legend will perform a newly arranged medley of "City of Stars" and "Audition" by the film's triple-nominated composer, Justin Hurwitz, who kept his sheet music notes under his arm throughout Friday's rehearsal.

"It's really cool to mess up on this stage," Legend said with a smile after striking an errant chord on the piano. Hurwitz coached the Grammy winner between takes.

Set against a backdrop that moves from a Los Angeles sunset to a starry night sky, choreographer Mandy Moore led a team of dancers through a routine that evokes the timeless ballroom moves Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling perform in the film. Two dancers even appear to float through the sky during the number.

"It's gonna be good, I promise," Moore told Hurwitz.

"It looks beautiful," he said nervously.

Co-lyricist Benj Pasek watched proudly from a seat in the theater.

"I am freaking out," the 31-year-old Oscar nominee said, adding that he brought his mother along to rehearsals.

"She's becoming best friends with all the people who run the Oscars," he said.

Sara Bareilles, who will sing for the show's In Memoriam tribute, had a brief Broadway-style moment with Miranda and "Hamilton" director Tommy Kail. The stage stars attempted to present the singer with a bottle of water, which she dramatically shunned, until embracing the Tony winners seconds later.

The 89th Academy Awards will air Sunday on ABC.

___

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Sandy Cohen at www.twitter.com/APSandy .

Jack White launches vinyl record plant in Detroit

Detroit-raised rocker Jack White is building on a vision to blend music and manufacturing in a part of his hometown that long inspired him.

The Grammy-winning singer, songwriter, guitarist, drummer and producer is overseeing the launch of a vinyl record pressing plant in the back of his Third Man Records shop north of downtown Detroit. Third Man Pressing holds its grand opening on Saturday.

The eight presses represent some of the first newly built machines installed in the U.S. in more than three decades — corresponding with a vinyl revival. White told The Associated Press on Friday that "there's so much demand for the records and so little supply."

"Two years ago we could not buy new presses," said White, decked out in yellow shoes and custom-made Third Man shirt. "We're the first place to really be the guinea pig of this."

White marvels at the bright yellow, German-made machines, which earlier this week churned out records by some legendary Detroit bands that inspired him, including The Stooges and MC5. He said the presses will kick out the jams, as it were, by pressing eye-popping, genre-spanning platters by Detroit bands of renown and then spread to other Third Man artists and those of other small labels.

The plant also is part of a revival for a part of the city where White and his former band, The White Stripes, got its start 20 years ago. White also attended high school at nearby Cass Tech, ran an upholstery shop and took "a couple classes" at Wayne State University.

"Out of the darkness comes the light: What was traditionally known as the roughest neighborhood in Detroit, the Cass Corridor, is now showing the most incredible fruits and beauty and progress," said White, who has recently collaborated with Beyoncé and A Tribe Called Quest.

White, who employed vinyl for his earliest releases, founded Third Man in Detroit in 2001 and both he and the business relocated to Nashville, Tennessee. Detroit's retail store opened in 2015. White and Shinola, a Detroit-based maker of watches, bikes and other goods, jointly bought the building.

"Down the street, Shinola is selling $2,500 turntables that they're making right there in front of people's eyes behind glass. We're going to be making records two doors down in front of glass. Can you believe this?" he mused. "This is in the Cass Corridor. You would have never have guessed any of this was going to happen. It's worth every cent, every second of energy people have put into it."

His goal is to keep expanding in Nashville and Detroit so that "there's nothing involved in the record that is not part of the Third Man system," including making record sleeves and metal plates for the presses. He likens the goal to that of another famous Detroit manufacturer, automotive pioneer Henry Ford.

"They had an idea about pouring raw materials into one end and out the other end came Model T cars," he said. "We're going to get there."

____

Follow Jeff Karoub on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jeffkaroub . His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/author/jeff-karoub.

Jack White launches vinyl record plant in Detroit

Detroit-raised rocker Jack White is building on a vision to blend music and manufacturing in a part of his hometown that long inspired him.

The Grammy-winning singer, songwriter, guitarist, drummer and producer is overseeing the launch of a vinyl record pressing plant in the back of his Third Man Records shop north of downtown Detroit. Third Man Pressing holds its grand opening on Saturday.

The eight presses represent some of the first newly built machines installed in the U.S. in more than three decades — corresponding with a vinyl revival. White told The Associated Press on Friday that "there's so much demand for the records and so little supply."

"Two years ago we could not buy new presses," said White, decked out in yellow shoes and custom-made Third Man shirt. "We're the first place to really be the guinea pig of this."

White marvels at the bright yellow, German-made machines, which earlier this week churned out records by some legendary Detroit bands that inspired him, including The Stooges and MC5. He said the presses will kick out the jams, as it were, by pressing eye-popping, genre-spanning platters by Detroit bands of renown and then spread to other Third Man artists and those of other small labels.

The plant also is part of a revival for a part of the city where White and his former band, The White Stripes, got its start 20 years ago. White also attended high school at nearby Cass Tech, ran an upholstery shop and took "a couple classes" at Wayne State University.

"Out of the darkness comes the light: What was traditionally known as the roughest neighborhood in Detroit, the Cass Corridor, is now showing the most incredible fruits and beauty and progress," said White, who has recently collaborated with Beyoncé and A Tribe Called Quest.

White, who employed vinyl for his earliest releases, founded Third Man in Detroit in 2001 and both he and the business relocated to Nashville, Tennessee. Detroit's retail store opened in 2015. White and Shinola, a Detroit-based maker of watches, bikes and other goods, jointly bought the building.

"Down the street, Shinola is selling $2,500 turntables that they're making right there in front of people's eyes behind glass. We're going to be making records two doors down in front of glass. Can you believe this?" he mused. "This is in the Cass Corridor. You would have never have guessed any of this was going to happen. It's worth every cent, every second of energy people have put into it."

His goal is to keep expanding in Nashville and Detroit so that "there's nothing involved in the record that is not part of the Third Man system," including making record sleeves and metal plates for the presses. He likens the goal to that of another famous Detroit manufacturer, automotive pioneer Henry Ford.

"They had an idea about pouring raw materials into one end and out the other end came Model T cars," he said. "We're going to get there."

____

Follow Jeff Karoub on Twitter at http://twitter.com/jeffkaroub . His work can be found at http://bigstory.ap.org/author/jeff-karoub.

Wisconsin man sent to prison for cutting off woman's finger

A Wisconsin man has been sentenced to 3 ½ years in prison after pleading no contest last year to cutting off a woman's finger as part of a ritual to honor a fellow rap music fan.

Twenty-four-year-old Jonathan Schrap was sentenced Friday on one count of second-degree reckless injury.

A complaint says Schrap and his friends were staging a "ritualistic memorial" at his house in August to commemorate a deceased member of the Juggalos, the name given to fans of the Detroit rap duo Insane Clown Posse.

WBAY-TV reports (http://bit.ly/2muwxy0 ) the woman allowed Schrap to cut her arm with a machete. She also let Schrap cut off her right pinky finger.

The mother of the woman's boyfriend convinced her to go to the hospital where staff called police.

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Information from: WBAY-TV, http://www.wbay.com

Obama returns to Broadway to see Arthur Miller's 'The Price'

The Obamas just can't quit Broadway.

Former President Barack Obama and his daughter Malia Obama have caught a new revival of Arthur Miller's "The Price." They attended the play starring Danny DeVito, Mark Ruffalo, Tony Shalhoub and Jessica Hecht at the American Airlines Theatre on Friday.

In "The Price," a police officer feels that life has passed him by while he took care of his now-dead father. He and his estranged brother must reunite to sell off dad's possessions.

The Obamas were big boosters of Broadway during his presidency, especially "Hamilton," ''A Raisin in the Sun" and "Joe Turner's Come and Gone." Members of the Obama family also attended "Memphis," ''Kinky Boots," ''Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," ''Sister Act," ''The Trip to Bountiful," ''Motown the Musical" and "The Addams Family."

Hillary and Bill Clinton have also been attending Broadway shows since the election, seeing the musicals "In Transit" and "The Color Purple."

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