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            Forever young Paul Rudd named Hasty Pudding Man of the Year

Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File

Forever young Paul Rudd named Hasty Pudding Man of the Year

Paul Rudd, the versatile and forever young actor and screenwriter who stars in "Ant-Man" was named 2018 Man of the Year by Harvard University's Hasty Pudding Theatricals on Thursday.

Rudd, 48, will get his pudding pot during a roast at Harvard on Feb. 2.

"He has starred in indies, mainstream films, acclaimed and often heartfelt comedies, and now he currently plays one of Marvel's biggest (and smallest) superheroes," the oldest collegiate theatrical organization in the nation announced.

He also apparently holds the secret to the fountain of youth.

"The entire company is in awe of his many accomplishments in film and television," Hasty Pudding President Amira Weeks said in a statement. "Specifically, in his ability to have not aged since 1995. Oh, and we hear he's a pretty funny guy, too."

Rudd co-wrote and starred in 2015's "Ant-Man" and its sequel due out this year, "Ant-Man and the Wasp."

He also plays the lead in "The Catcher Was a Spy," the real-life story of Ivy Leaguer and major league ballplayer Moe Berg, a spy with the forerunner of the CIA during World War II, premiering later this month at the Sundance Film Festival.

Previous film credits include "Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy," ''This is 40" and "Knocked Up."

Hasty Pudding gives out the awards annually to people "who have made lasting and impressive contributions to the world of entertainment."

Last year's man of the year was Ryan Reynolds. Previous winners dating to 1967 include James Stewart, Sylvester Stallone and Samuel L. Jackson.

Mila Kunis was named 2018 Woman of the Year last week.


            Prosecutors want to call 19 other accusers at Cosby retrial

AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File

Prosecutors want to call 19 other accusers at Cosby retrial

Prosecutors preparing for Bill Cosby's retrial on sexual assault charges want to call 19 other accusers to try to show a pattern of "prior bad acts" over five decades.

The comedian's first trial ended with a hung jury in June. In that proceeding, prosecutors asked to call 13 other accusers, but the judge allowed only one to testify.

A lawyer for Cosby says she can't comment on Thursday's filing.

The 80-year-old comedian is charged with knocking out a Temple University employee with pills and sexually assaulting her in 2004.

Cosby has said the sexual encounter was consensual.

Pennsylvania law allows testimony about "prior bad acts" if they fit a nearly identical crime pattern. Prosecutors say that's the case for the TV star once dubbed "America's Dad."


            Brigitte Bardot: 'MeToo' actresses are 'hypocritical'

AP Photo/Remy de la Mauviniere, File

Brigitte Bardot: 'MeToo' actresses are 'hypocritical'

Former French actress and sex symbol Brigitte Bardot says most actresses who have protested sexual harassment are "hypocritical" and "ridiculous" because many of them "tease" producers to land film parts.

The star of "And God Created Woman" says many actresses have come out with sexual misconduct allegations "so that we talk about them."

In an interview with Paris-Match weekly published Thursday, the 83-year-old Bardot says she's never been a victim of sexual harassment and that she thought "it was nice to be told that I was beautiful or that I had a nice little ass."

Bardot is the second French film industry star to distance herself from the worldwide protest movement against sexual misconduct. Catherine Deneuve has signed a collective op-ed saying "insistent or clumsy hitting-on is not a crime."

Dolly Parton earns two Guinness World Records

Dolly Parton has yet another accomplishment to add to her already legendary list: two world records.

Billboard reported the singer and songwriter holds Guinness World Records for the most decades with a Top 20 hit on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart, with six decades, and most hits on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart by a female artist, with 107 hits.

>> Read more trending news 

Parton has Top 20 Billboard hits across six consecutive decades, starting with 1967’s “Something Fishy” and ending with a 2016 version of her 1974 song, “Jolene” with Pentatonix. That same 2016 song set the record for her 107th Hot Country Songs chart entry. Her first was “Dumb Blonde” in 1967.

“To receive these two Guinness World Records is so great,” Parton said in a statement. Joining so many wonderful singers and songwriters who have been honoured this way feels so special to me. You never know when you start out with your work how it’s going to turn out, but to have these two world records makes me feel very humbled and blessed!”

Parton’s six-decade run puts her in the company of George Jones, the only other country artist who spent more than five decades on the Hot Country Songs chart.

Speaking to Guinness World Records about her songwriting process, Parton said it comes from her own experiences.

“I’ve always just written from my heart,” she said. “I try not to dwell on just trying to be commercial and what's a radio hit or whatever. Usually when an idea hits me, it comes from my heart, but I still try to be alert and to be aware and to try to be as up-to-date as I can be, and evidently I’m doing alright after all these decades.”


            Prince Harry, Meghan Markel visit Wales in whirlwind tour

Ben Birchall/Pool Photo via AP

Prince Harry, Meghan Markel visit Wales in whirlwind tour

Prince Harry has introduced his American fiancee to a new part of Britain ahead of their planned nuptials in May.

On Thursday, the 33-year-old prince took Meghan Markle to Wales, where they delighted crowds outside Cardiff Castle despite arriving an hour late because of train problems as high winds buffeted Britain.

The prince and his soon-to-be-royal bride greeted fans and shook hands with dozens who had waited in the cold for a chance to greet them.

Markle wore a black coat by British designer Stella McCartney and stylish jeans from a Welsh designer, Hiut Denim. Harry wore a blue sweater.

Harry and Markle have already made pre-wedding trips to Nottingham and to the Brixton neighborhood in south London. They will marry on May 19 at Windsor Castle.


            Justin Timberlake says he's made peace with Janet Jackson

AP Photo/David Phillip, File

Justin Timberlake says he's made peace with Janet Jackson

Justin Timberlake says he has made up with Janet Jackson following the infamous "wardrobe malfunction" at the Super Bowl in 2004.

When asked on a Beats 1 radio interview broadcast Thursday if he and Jackson have since made peace, Timberlake said, "Absolutely."

The singer, who is preparing for the release of his fourth solo album, says he and Jackson have talked privately about the incident.

"I don't know that a lot of people know that," Timberlake says. "I mean, I don't think it's my job to do that, because you value the relationships that you do have with people."

At the infamous halftime show, Timberlake ripped Jackson's costume to reveal her right breast, bare except for a nipple ring. Jackson was barred a week later from the Grammy telecast.


            Stars turn out for swansong of Louis Vuitton designer

AP Photo/Francois Mori

Stars turn out for swansong of Louis Vuitton designer

The celebrity allure of Paris Fashion Week was at its height on Thursday as the notables from the worlds of sports, film and fashion attended the Louis Vuitton swansong show for designer Kim Jones.

Here are some highlights of the fall-winter 2018-19 menswear shows.

STARS ATTEND VUITTON DESIGNER SWANSONG

The stars were out in force to bid farewell to Jones after Michael Burke, Vuitton's chairman and chief executive officer, confirmed he would be departing the fashion house's menswear division after six years at the helm.

When Victoria Beckham arrived solo at the Palais Royal show venue, dressed in a beige menswear coat and oversize bellbottoms, that alone was enough to trigger mayhem. But that was little in comparison to the frantic scene that ensued the moment she was joined by her husband, David, in a midnight blue Vuitton sweater, and their 18-year-old son Brooklyn in a jazzy red Vuitton-branded shirt.

Soccer player Neymar then pulled up and sent paparazzi leaping to get close to the stars.

During the show, there were screams of delight as Kate Moss and Naomi Campbell both strutted down the catwalk in sexy monogrammed rain coats for their final ode to the influential designer.

It's not known where Jones will be headed — and Versace has not confirmed reports they held discussions to bring him on.

David Beckham, a personal friend of the 38-year-old British designer, came to see him off.

"I can't wait to see what he's going to do next," Beckham said. "But it's been an amazing journey for him."

___

VUITTON'S CONSTANT VOYAGE

Exploration and travel were the touchstones in Jones' sportswear-influenced collection, inspired by photos of the Kenyan landscape.

The aerial images, taken from a helicopter, were used as swirling prints and kinetic motifs on dark navy bombers, or on flat-fronted organza hunting shirts and sporty leggings.

The colors of African rock features — slate, granite and sandstone — influenced the collection's masculine palette, which was shot through with the bright colors of rock-climbing attire in neon yellow, orange and silver.

Adventure was at the heart of this fun show with big hiker boots stomping down the runway.

References spanned from the Wild West (a gray cowboy hat) to Siberia (an intarsia mink coat.)

Jones said it was about "discovering something new. A constant voyage."

He could have been referring to the collection — or perhaps his personal journey, wherever that may be.

___

ISSEY MIYAKE GOES URBAN

Issey Miyake has been known to travel to the Arctic and the far-flung natural world for fashion inspiration. But on Thursday the Franco-Japanese house didn't stray far from home — channeling the urban environment.

It may have been a smart thematic way to stay on-trend with the utilitarian work wear mania stomping men's runways of late.

A utilitarian mac with zippers and toggles, notable for its voluminous proportions and twinned with white sneakers, was colored in a Renaissance-worthy carmine pink. The house designer Yusuke Takahashi always mixes in a gentle touch.

The show demonstrated why Issey Miyake is known as a techno-fabric-loving brand — several designs had an intentional "scrunched" effect owing to stretch tape stitched along the body.

A messy-looking oversized suit in gunmetal, described as "wearable without ironing," looked useful for those who need to get to work without having enough time to prepare. The model himself had slightly wild hair.

Stripes and bright colors punctuated what was a rather tame display this season.

___

RICK OWENS' GREEK MYTHS

Designer Rick Owens used his funky, grungy menswear runway show to explore Greek myths.

Primitive-style fabrics in rough camel hair flannel and double-knit cotton were fashioned in slashed and almost-Biblical frayed silhouettes. The collection was inspired by the arrogant King Sisyphus, who was condemned by Zeus to roll a boulder up a hill and down forever.

The story was, said Owens, a lesson that it's easy to fall into "unhealthy cycles" in real life.

"Does this mean unhealthy cycles and base urges are an integral part of the human condition?" asked the designer-cum-philosopher. His 40 designs, which relied on layering, seemed to answer Owens' rhetorical question in the affirmative.

Huge lapels on an unstructured rock-colored coat unfurled as if they were being yanked open, above bare legs. While some white tunic looks evoked an inverted blown-up sleeve, slashed sections seemed to hint that the garment had been damaged by the impact of a boulder or by a long perilous journey.

Chains that descended down some bare chests over nipples evoked bondage but other designs included covered-up looks — huge paneled statement coats — as Owens wrestled with opposing instincts.

___

Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K


            Long before SAG Awards, statuettes start out as molten metal

Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File

Long before SAG Awards, statuettes start out as molten metal

Winners of the Screen Actors Guild Awards often remark on their statuettes — their green-black appearance, their hefty weight — but the awards start out in a decidedly different state: as molten metal.

Winners often tell stories about how much the award, conferred to them by the 121,000-plus members of the guild SAG-AFTRA, mean to them. And for individual film acting winners, the honor often means another piece of hardware: an Academy Award.

Long before the glitzy awards ceremony, which will be held Sunday at Los Angeles' Shrine Auditorium, the statuettes are forged in a decidedly unglamorous foundry on an industrial side street in Burbank. Men in welding masks and reflective suits craft the trophies using a metal-working that is process centuries old to create the award, which depicts an actor holding the drama and comedy masks. Once the statuette is done, a process that takes several weeks, the award weighs 12 pounds — nearly four pounds heavier than an Oscar.

The statuettes are created by pouring molten bronze into a wax mold. The bronze is heated to approximately 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, said Angel Meza a production manager at the American Fine Arts Foundary who has helped oversee the crafting of the award, called "The Actor," for several years. Machines whir and chains clank as the heavily-protected workers pour the liquid metal into molds, which grow bright as they're filled. After cooling down for several minutes, the men dismantle the molds and despite their oversized protective mitts, bobble the pieces in their hands as they pass them onto a table.

"To see the labor and see what really goes on, the artistry of it, I think is magnificent. These skills — I don't think people are aware," said Ann Dowd, who is nominated for a SAG Award as part of the cast for "The Handmaid's Tale." She was one of several celebrities who watched the creation of several statuettes during an event earlier this month.

"We see these beautiful old buildings, we see statues, and they're going away because that craftsmanship — it's rare, I think, to have those skills and that artistry," she said.

The initial molding process takes about 15 minutes.

It takes weeks to cast, polish, apply a patina to the dozens of statuettes needed for the SAG Awards. The show honors the best performances in film and television from the previous year. The show awards several large cast ensembles, including stunt performers, making it impossible to know before the ceremony exactly how many will be handed each year.

"Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" is the leading film nominee, while the HBO drama "Big Little Lies" leads all television nominees.

Whether Dowd is among the winners Sunday, she said watching the crafting of the statuettes was a treat.

"Nothing thrills me more than seeing how things come together," Dowd said. "I've gone to factories, to quarries, and this was extraordinary."

___

For full coverage of awards season, including a time-lapse video of the creation of the SAG Actor statuette, visit: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason


            In TV interview, Farrow describes alleged Allen assault

CBS via AP

In TV interview, Farrow describes alleged Allen assault

In her first televised interview, Dylan Farrow described in detail Woody Allen's alleged sexual assault of her, and called actors who work in his films "complicit" in perpetuating a "culture of silence."

Farrow, the adopted daughter of Allen and Mia Farrow, appeared in a taped interview Thursday on "CBS This Morning." Farrow recounted the 1992 incident, when she was 7 years old, in which she said Allen molested her in her mother's Connecticut home.

"With so much silence being broken by so many brave people against so many high-profile people, I felt it was important to add my story to theirs because it's something I've struggled with for a long time," Farrow said. "It was very momentous for me to see this conversation finally carried into a public setting."

Farrow, now 32, described being taken to a crawl space by Allen.

"He instructed me to lay down on my stomach and play with my brother's toy train that was set up," she said. "And he sat behind me in the doorway, and as I played with the toy train, I was sexually assaulted," Farrow said.

Allen was investigated but wasn't charged, and he has long denied inappropriately touching Farrow. In a statement Thursday, Allen reiterated his denial and said "the Farrow family is cynically using the opportunity afforded by the Time's Up movement to repeat this discredited allegation."

"I never molested my daughter — as all investigations concluded a quarter of a century ago," Allen said.

After a seven-month investigation, a team of child-abuse specialists at Yale-New Haven Hospital concluded Dylan was not been molested. The doctor leading the investigation, John M. Leventhal, later said in a sworn statement that he theorized Dylan either invented the story or had it planted in her mind by her mother. But Connecticut state attorney Frank Maco says there was "probable cause" to charge Allen with molesting Dylan and that police had drawn up an arrest warrant, but that he decided not to pursue the case, in part because it would traumatize Dylan.

Allen noted that Dylan's older brother Moses has said he witnessed their mother coaching Dylan. "It seems to have worked — and, sadly, I'm sure Dylan truly believes what she says," said Allen. Farrow's younger brother Ronan Farrow, who has written several exposes for The New Yorker on Harvey Weinstein, has supported Dylan's claims.

Dylan Farrow first spoke publicly about the incident in a 2013 Vanity Fair article and a 2014 open letter to The New York Times. On CBS, she called Allen's version of events — that a distraught Mia Farrow coached her story — "crazy."

"What I don't understand is how this crazy story of me being brainwashed and coached is more believable than what I'm saying about being sexually assaulted by my father," Farrow said on CBS.

Dylan now lives married with a 16-month-old daughter in Connecticut. When a clip from a 1992 "60 Minutes" interview of Allen denying the allegation was played, Farrow began crying.

"He's lying, and he's been lying for so long. And it's difficult for me to see him and hear his voice," Farrow said.

In recent days, several actors who have worked with Allen have distanced themselves from the 82-year-old filmmaker.

Timothee Chalamet on Tuesday said he will donate his salary for an upcoming Allen film to three charities fighting sexual harassment and abuse: Time's Up, the LGBT Center in New York and RAINN. The breakout star of "Call Me By Your Name" said he didn't want to profit from his work on Allen's "A Rainy Day in New York," which wrapped shooting in the fall.

Rebecca Hall ("A Rainy Day in New York," ''Vicky Cristina Barcelona"), Mira Sorvino ("Mighty Aphrodite"), Ellen Page ("To Rome With Love"), David Krumholtz ("Wonder Wheel") and Griffith Newman ("A Rainy Day in New York") have all in some way distanced themselves from Allen or vowed they wouldn't work with him again.


            Outdoor artworks illuminate London in Lumiere Festival

Jonathan Brady/PA via AP

Outdoor artworks illuminate London in Lumiere Festival

The dark January streets of London are being transformed into an illuminated outdoor gallery as part of the Lumiere arts festival .

The festival, which runs for four nights starting Thursday, features more than 50 light-based artworks across the city. Some sit in alleyways or parks, while others light up buildings including Westminster Abbey and the National Theatre.

Organizers say more than 1 million people attended the free festival when it was first held in the city two years ago, enjoying the rare chance to stroll usually traffic-clogged streets closed to traffic.

"We take London, a massive world city — such a machine in terms of getting people in and out and shopping and so on — and for a brief moment we stop that," said Helen Marriage, director of arts charity Artichoke, which organizes Lumiere.

The works, by artists from around the world, are alternately eerie, surprising and playful. In a West End courtyard, French artist Stephane Masson's "Supercube" resembles a vending-machine full of mason jars, displaying a cornucopia of moving images.

Jo Pocock and the team Lantern Company have filled Leicester Square with giant plants, animals and butterflies, in a surreal scene with echoes of "Alice in Wonderland."

Near King's Cross Station, "Waterlicht," ("Water Light") by Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde, makes visitors feel they are underneath roiling blue waves. It's both a comment on global warming and a delightful illusion.

Nearby, Canadian artist Rami Bebawi has planted a small park with a field of flower-like plastic stems that glow in different colors and click gently in the breeze.

Rhys Coren has projected an animated film onto the grand Georgian facade of the Royal Academy building for the work "RA — Love Motion."

"I've never worked on this scale before," said the London-based artist, who admitted to being apprehensive about the reaction he would get.

But he said he'd noticed that the music that's part of his work acts like "a Pied Piper effect," drawing passers-by into becoming spectators.

Marriage said the festival taps into a hunger for live experience — "the 'be there or you've missed it' moment" — in an age when we spend much of our time staring at screens.

"Standing in a crowd, sharing a moment, is really important," she said.


            Despite doping scandals, Olympic fever grips Russian cinemas

Central Partnership photo via AP

Despite doping scandals, Olympic fever grips Russian cinemas

Russia's going crazy for the Olympics. The 1972 Olympics.

Even as the Russian team faces up to being barred from next month's Winter Games for doping offenses, audiences are flocking to see a movie about Soviet glory on the Olympic basketball court 46 years ago.

"Three Seconds" tells the story of the Soviet Union team which won gold in 1972, becoming the first basketball team in history ever to beat the United States at the Olympics.

It's a tale of Cold War rivalry, inspiring speeches and something very familiar to Russian sports fans after recent scandals — a gold medal decided by officials.

After pulling in crowds throughout the holiday season, last week "Three Seconds" became the highest-earning Russian movie ever in domestic cinemas with 1.84 billion rubles ($32.5 million) in takings, according to a government-backed statistics service.

At a screening in central Moscow on Thursday, audience members whooped and applauded as Alexander Belov sank the winning Soviet basket to beat the U.S. 51-50, and then cheered again when the original 1972 footage was played alongside the credits.

"I was crying tears of joy," cinemagoer Nina Parshikova said. To the millions of Russians who consider their country unfairly persecuted over doping allegations, even the Cold War can seem a simpler time. Audience member Yegor Druzhinin said: "Now politics plays more of a role. Then it was sport."

Actor Kuzma Saprykin used his childhood basketball experience to play Ivan Edeshko, who threw what Russians still call the "golden pass" for the Soviets' winning basket.

"I didn't think there would actually be this kind of colossal success," he told The Associated Press. "It's surprising when people send me videos, how at practically every screening people are clapping, with some kind of patriotism and spirit awakening in people."

In Russia, the game has similar significance to the U.S. "Miracle on Ice," its defeat of the Soviet hockey team at the 1980 Olympics.

The U.S. remembers the 1972 basketball gold medal game very differently — as a robbery.

The last three seconds of the final were replayed twice after the Soviet team protested their signal for a timeout had been ignored, and the U.S. players twice celebrated victory before being told to play again. On the third and final play, Soviet player Ivan Edeshko threw a full-court pass for Belov to score a last-second layup.

The result prompted days of wrangling between officials from both nations and the international basketball federation. That's left out of the movie, as is the U.S. players' decision to reject their silver medals, which still lie unclaimed with the International Olympic Committee.

The script also suggests the Soviets were facing top U.S. pros, when in fact the U.S. fielded college players including future NBA stars like three-time All Star Doug Collins, and Tom McMillen, later a congressman. The Soviet team, while technically amateurs under the then-current Olympic rules, was effectively composed of full-time pro players several years older than most of the Americans.

The movie plays up its Cold War rivalry, portraying the U.S. team and fans as brash, overconfident rule-breakers, though ultimately courageous. The movie also takes some digs at the Soviet system's rationed healthcare and the cultural divides between what would later become independent countries. Edeshko says it's a "just and honest" view.

Some family members of deceased players have objected to the way it portrays the team. Belov, who scored the winning basket, spends much of the movie balancing romance with news he's terminally ill. However, his widow told Russian media outlet Meduza that the real Belov, who died of a rare cancer in 1978 aged 26, was single and healthy in 1972.

The upcoming soccer World Cup in Russia provides more fodder for sports movies, with a biography of Soviet goalkeeper Lev Yashin in the pipeline, as well as a fictionalized story of a modern-day coach.

For Saprykin, the actor, "Three Seconds" illuminates Russia's ongoing love and respect for Soviet sports stars. He says he and Edeshko are now "like grandfather and grandson" after bonding on set — and a nagging feeling that modern athletes don't match up.

Looking at photographs of the 1972 team, "you get goosebumps because you understand that there's three people left (who played in the 1972 final) and that's it," he said. They're leaving and there aren't any new legends. That's the worst."


            Pharrell and N.E.R.D to headline NBA All-Star halftime show

Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File

Pharrell and N.E.R.D to headline NBA All-Star halftime show

The NBA announced Thursday that 11-time Grammy winner Pharrell and his hip-hop-rock band N.E.R.D will headline the halftime show at the 2018 NBA All-Star game in Los Angeles next month.

Fergie, who has eight Grammys, will sing "The Star-Spangled Banner" prior to tip-off. Canadian rockers Barenaked Ladies will perform the national anthem of their home country.

The Feb. 18 game will air live at 8 p.m. Eastern on TNT from the Staples Center. It will be seen in more than 200 countries.

Pharrell and the band, which released its fifth studio album last month, will perform a medley of chart-topping hits. Fergie released her second full-length album, "Double Dutchess," and a companion visual album in September. She is a host of the new Fox show "The Four: Battle for Stardom."

Kevin Hart will open the night.

___

Corrects spelling to N.E.R.D in overlines, story.


            Has #MeToo gone too far? Ansari story sparks debate

Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

Has #MeToo gone too far? Ansari story sparks debate

The #MeToo movement has been embraced by legions of women as a vital step toward countering widespread sexual abuse and misconduct. This week, more so than at any point in the movement's brief history, there's visceral discussion about its potential for causing harm.

The catalyst was the publication by Babe.net of an account by a woman identified only as "Grace" detailing her 2017 encounter with comedian Aziz Ansari. The article intimated that Ansari deserved inclusion in the ranks of abusive perpetrators, yet many readers — women and men — concluded the encounter amounted to an all-too-common instance of bad sex during a date gone awry.

Ansari has said he apologized immediately after the woman told him about her discomfort during an encounter he believed to be consensual.

"Too many women have joined #MeToo too quickly and unthinkingly," said Carole Lieberman, a Beverly Hills psychiatrist and author of the relationship books "Bad Boys" and "Bad Girls."

"Though they may have wanted to be in solidarity with other women, the stories of dates gone wrong or women scorned have detracted from women who have been raped or seriously sexually assaulted," she said.

A conservative analyst, Carrie Lukas of the Independent Women's Forum, said Ansari "believed that everything that occurred with his accuser was consensual and welcomed."

"His reputation is now in tatters," Lukas wrote in an email. "Is that really fair?"

Online and in person, many women are talking about experiences comparable to Grace's account — encounters with men who initially seemed wonderful, but turned pushy, if not criminally abusive, when things became sexual.

Sarah Hosseini, who writes about sex for Bustle, Romper, Scary Mommy and Ravishly, said the #MeToo movement might actually benefit from the Grace/Ansari controversy, and that the movement is big enough to encompass another layer in the discussion.

"There is some really murky and confusing sexual territory here that we haven't really talked about yet collectively as a society," she wrote, adding that the woman's account in Babe was "disgusting and cringe-worthy."

"What she experienced with Ansari is not OK. But do we have language yet for intimate encounters that teeter on the edge of absolute sexual assault/abuse?" she wondered. "I don't think we do. We've lived in a misogynistic world with misogynistic sex for so long. We thought this "bad sex" was normal. Until someone spoke up and said, this is NOT normal. This is not OK."

Michael Cunningham, a psychology professor at the University of Louisville, said the Grace/Ansari encounter reflected misunderstandings that may arise due to differences between conventional dating relationships and hook-ups.

"It appears that Grace wanted Ansari to treat her as a potential girlfriend to be courted over multiple dates, rather than a pickup from a party engaging in a mutually acceptable transaction," Cunningham wrote in an email. "When he did not rise to her expectations, she converted her understandable disappointment into a false #MeToo."

Liz Wolfe, managing editor of Young Voices, a D.C.-based organization that distributes op-eds by millennials, said the Ansari story gets at the core of what men and women are taught regarding dating, sex and romance. Men should pursue, women should play hard to get.

"So many women have wondered in a situation, 'Have I said "no" decisively enough?'" Wolfe said. "They can't quite figure out whether they want to go forward or leave. ... And from the male perspective, he can't quite figure out what the woman wants."

Wolfe has noticed a generational divide in their reactions. Older women tend to think Grace should have been more vocal and assertive, or simply left Ansari's apartment. Younger women feel that Ansari should have read Grace's body language and listened to her more closely, and he was at fault for pressuring her.

Among men, likewise, there are varying views.

Tahir Duckett of ReThink, a nonprofit seeking to deter boys and young men from committing sexual assault, says the #MeToo movement "is exactly where it needs to be" as it continues to embolden victims.

"This moment absolutely calls for a changed approach to dating and courtship," he said. "It means paying just as much attention to body language as we do to words, and stopping to check in if at any time you're anything less than 100 percent certain the other participant is as enthusiastic as you about what's going on."

However, Glenn Sacks, a commentator who writes often about men's issues, said the Ansari case buttresses his belief that #MeToo "is lumping the trivial mistakes or misdeeds of the many in with the genuinely awful actions of a handful."

Warren Farrell, an early member of the National Organization for Women who more recently has authored such books as "Why Men Are the Way they Are" and "The Boy Crisis," suggested that women should bear more of the responsibility for initiating sexual interest. And he recommended training in schools for each gender to view relationship issues from the other's perspective.

"When #MeToo focuses only on women complaining and not both sexes hearing each other, it reinforces the feeling of women as fragile snowflakes rather than empowered to speak, and empowered to listen," Farrell said. "Boys and men, like girls and women, also grew up confused about what was expected of them sexually in a culture that did not make speaking about sex easy for either sex."

Alexandra Allred, an author and self-defense instructor in Dallas, groaned when she read Grace's account of her evening with Ansari.

"It really does sound like it was a mutual thing, but she thought about it later and she didn't enjoy herself," Allred said. "But this is the story of millions of young women everywhere, where you just made a mistake. This does not belong to the #MeToo movement. She should have just kept this to herself."

As a supporter of the movement, Allred worries that this kind of story might generate a backlash and prompt skepticism when other women report abuses.

"This isn't show and tell," she said. "This is a movement to educate people and hopefully stop the violence."


            British actor Peter Wyngarde dies in London hospital aged 90

PA, File via AP

British actor Peter Wyngarde dies in London hospital aged 90

Longtime British television and stage star Peter Wyngarde, best known for his role as the detective Jason King in the 1970s, has died. He was 90.

His manager Thomas Bowington said Thursday the actor died Monday in Chelsea and Westminster hospital in London after an illness that lasted several months.

"His mind was razor sharp until the end," Bowington told The Associated Press. "He entertained that whole hospital. He was funny until the end."

The stylish Wyngarde and the characters he portrayed have been cited by the creators of the "Austin Powers" films as one of the inspirations for the fictional 1960s spy with a flair for flashy outfits and a taste for carousing.

Wyngarde was best known for his sleuthing role in the popular "Department S" television series but played numerous other parts, appearing in shows and movies including "The Avengers, "The Saint," ''Flash Gordon" and others.

His manager said Wyngarde had not retired from performing and that plans for further stage work and personal appearances had been cut short by his death.

"He was a mentor on everything you can think of, from sports cars to how to make a good cup of tea and how to do a tie and shirt," Bowington said.

Wyngarde's father was a diplomat. The actor was born in France and educated in several countries before starting his career in Britain.


            Country stars from Vegas festival to perform Grammy tribute

AP Photo/Ron Jenkins, File

Country stars from Vegas festival to perform Grammy tribute

Three performers at last year's Route 91 Harvest Festival where a gunman opened fire on fans will perform a tribute at this year's Grammy Awards to honor victims killed at live music events this past year.

Eric Church, Maren Morris and Brothers Osborne, who performed at the three-day country festival prior to the mass shooting last October, will collaborate on a special performance at the 60th annual Grammy Awards, airing live on CBS from New York on Jan. 28.

The shooting in Las Vegas was the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. modern history. It came in a year when 22 people were killed in a bombing outside an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England, in May.

Church headlined the first night of the festival, which was the last night of his tour. A gunman perched in a window of a hotel-casino overlooking the outdoor festival opened fire on the crowd during the final night of the festival as Jason Aldean was performing, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds more.

"In all honesty, there's not a day that goes by since that day that I have not thought of it and thought of the people and the victims," Church told The Associated Press. "That being our last show of the year, I took it in differently than I have maybe taken in other shows. I savored it. I remember everything about it."

Church, who wrote a song called "Why Not Me" immediately after the shooting, said he knew some of the victims because they were members of his tightknit fan club and said he appreciates that the Grammy producers wanted to reserve time in the show to remember those music fans who had been lost.

"Mass shootings, they happen every year, unfortunately," Church said. "But this year was a little bit unique in that you had two happen at music events and one of those was the largest mass shooting in U.S. history. It's been a tragic year."

Ken Ehrlich, executive producer of the Grammys, said the country artists will perform a classic Grammy-winning song, which hasn't been announced. "We considered a number of songs. We wanted something that is universal. We wanted something that spoke to the subject, which certainly this song does," he said. "When you listen to the lyric, this one certainly stood out."

Morris, a nominee for best country solo performance, performed the night before the shooting. She said she's heard directly from fans that the attacks have left them scared to go to shows, and said that it has affected artists as well.

"As an artist and a performer, I don't want to be afraid to walk out on a stage each night," Morris said. "I know that we've all been reckoning with that for the last several months."

Morris said it felt right to have performers from that festival lead the tribute. "It reinforces even more the strength of music and the community that we all share together, artists and fans alike."

Church said the attacks shattered the sense of safety and comfort that music can sometimes bring. He said that's been the hardest thing for him as an artist to deal with, but added that those attacks can't stop musicians or their fans.

"You don't let it kill the music and you don't let it destroy the moment," Church said.

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Online:

www.grammy.com

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Follow Kristin M. Hall at twitter.com/kmhall


            UK media: Police probe 3rd Spacey sex assault allegation

Photo by Joel Ryan/Invision/AP, File

UK media: Police probe 3rd Spacey sex assault allegation

Britain's media say police in London are investigating a third allegation of sexual assault against two-time Academy Award winning actor Kevin Spacey.

The Metropolitan Police force said Thursday it had received an allegation "that the man sexually assaulted a man (Victim 3) in 2005 in Westminster."

The force didn't identify Spacey as the alleged perpetrator, as authorities in Britain don't name suspects until they are charged. But it said the same man was accused of an assault in 2005 and one in 2008, both in the south London borough of Lambeth. The suspect in those cases has been widely named in British media as Spacey.

The 58-year old Spacey was artistic director of London's Old Vic Theatre, located in Lambeth, between 2004 and 2015.

USA Gymnastics says it will not fine McKayla Maroney if she speaks out against team doctor

USA Gymnastics said Tuesday evening it will not fine gymnast McKayla Maroney if she speaks publicly about the alleged abuse by former team doctor Larry Nassar.

Maroney, who signed a nondisclosure agreement for $1.25 million with USA Gymnastics in in December 2016 in exchange for her silence, is currently suing USA Gymnastics, the U.S. Olympic Committee and Michigan State University with the claim that the nondisclosure agreement she signed after claiming Nassar molested her was illegal. 

>> PREVIOUS STORY: Chrissy Teigen offers to pay McKayla Maroney's possible $100K fine to speak out about team doctor

USA Gymnastics said in a statement it has not and will not seek retribution if Maroney speaks about alleged abuse by Nassar during his four-day sentencing.

As of Wednesday morning, Maroney was not expected to speak at Nassar’s sentencing.

"USA Gymnastics has not sought and will not seek any money from McKayla Maroney for her brave statements made in describing her victimization and abuse by Larry Nassar, nor for any victim impact statements she wants to make to Larry Nassar at this hearing or at any subsequent hearings related to his sentencing,” the statement to USA TODAY read. “This has been her right and USA Gymnastics encourages McKayla and anyone who has been abused to speak out. USA Gymnastics remains focused on our highest priority — the safety, health and well-being of our athletes and creating a culture that empowers and supports them."

In response to reports Tuesday that USA Gymnastics could fine Maroney up to $100,000 if she spoke out against Nassar at his sentencing like nearly 100 other alleged victims, model Chrissy Teigen offered to pay the fine.

>> Read more trending news 

“The entire principle of this should be fought – an NDA to stay quiet about this serial monster with over 140 accusers, but I would be absolutely honored to pay this fine for you, McKayla,” Teigen wrote.

After Nassar pleaded guilty to criminal sexual conduct in November, his sentencing on seven sexual assault charges began Tuesday. 

The former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State doctor is currently serving a 60-year sentence in federal prison on child pornography charges.

  Chrissy Teigen offers to pay McKayla Maroney's possible $100K fine to speak out about team doctor
 

            Is it news? Ansari story triggers media ethics debate

Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Is it news? Ansari story triggers media ethics debate

What makes a private sexual encounter newsworthy? A little-known website raised that very question after publishing an unidentified woman's vivid account of comedian Aziz Ansari's sexual advances while the two were on a date.

The story on Babe.net threw a wrench into the #MeToo movement, with some feminist writers dismissing the incident as a bad date that should have remained private. Others welcomed the piece for spurring a debate over deeper cultural attitudes that normalize aggressive behavior toward women.

Media ethics experts say it's not easy to determine what constitutes a legitimate story of sexual misconduct in the midst of a social movement that has emboldened people to speak out on subjects once considered taboo.

"What takes this out of the realm of a really bad date and into the realm of something that is publicly significant?" asked Ed Wasserman, dean of the journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley. "It's a little borderline."

  The story, which appeared Saturday, offers a detailed 3,000-word account of a night out between Ansari and a 23-year-old Brooklyn photographer that ended at the comedian's home. The woman told the site that the actor repeatedly initiated sexual activity despite what she later called "clear non-verbal cues" indicating her discomfort and lack of interest. She also reportedly told Ansari that she didn't want to "feel forced" in the encounter.

The woman told Babe.net that she eventually decided the incident was a sexual assault and said she was angered when she saw Ansari wearing a "Time's Up" pin at the Golden Globe Awards. The pin referred to a movement against sexual misconduct in Hollywood.

The website published screenshots of what it said were text messages between the two the next day. The woman told Ansari the encounter had made her uncomfortable; he texted back with an apology. The story was initially published with no comment from Ansari because, the website said, his representatives did not get back to them by its deadline.

Many major news organizations reacted cautiously. The Associated Press and other media outlets did not report on the story until Ansari issued a public statement addressing the claim the next day. The actor, who stars on the Netflix hit "Master of None," acknowledged that he apologized to a woman last year when she told him about her discomfort during a sexual encounter in his apartment that he believed to be consensual.

Feminist writers, other actors and media commentators were left to debate the public value of an anonymous tale about a confusing encounter at a time when more women are speaking publicly about sexual assault.

Some prominent women, including Whoopi Goldberg and Ashleigh Banfield, a host on the CNN spinoff HLN, concluded that the story didn't describe sexual misconduct of any kind and lacked newsworthiness. The feminist writer Jill Filipovic, in a column for The Guardian , said the piece touched on the need for more stories about "how pervasive power imbalances benefit men and make sex worse for women." But she said Babe.net squandered that opportunity by failing to "tell this particular story with the care it called for" and muddying the line between sexual assault and misogynistic behavior.  

The story's reporter and editors at Babe.net, which is less than two years old and says it has 3 million readers, have publicly defended their news judgment. "We stand by our story," said site editor Amanda Ross. Babe.net is published by Tab Media, a company that has received funding from Rupert Murdoch.

Helen Benedict, a Columbia journalism professor, said the story's one-sided, anonymous account was difficult to judge. But that, she said, encapsulates the tension between the public's need to know and the obligation of the media to protect sources, particularly people who say they are victims of sexual assault and request anonymity.

Benedict said the story didn't sufficiently press the woman on her motivations and took a flippant approach as to whether the incident constituted sexual assault. "I don't feel that the reporters asked enough about what the goal was," she said. "What does she want?"

Ryan Thomas, an assistant professor at the Missouri School of Journalism, said the piece lacked the rigor of other stories that used multiple sources to establish a clear pattern of abuse by prominent men like Harvey Weinstein and Louis C.K.

"Most of the journalism has been very methodical in identifying a catalog of incidents to build a picture of a pattern of behavior," Thomas said. By contrast, he said, the Babe.net story "focuses on a single case against a named individual by an anonymous individual," thus raising questions about its newsworthiness and the care with which it was reported.

Few have called into question the veracity of the report, particularly because Ansari himself did not dispute it.

Wasserman, the Berkeley professor, said he finds it difficult to criticize the piece for crossing any lines of journalistic integrity. After wrestling with the question of whether the article addressed an issue of legitimate public concern, he said, he "reluctantly" sided with Babe.net.

"Is this news? It really does come out of an area of activity that is normally considered to be pretty private," he said. "But on balance, the entire question of sexual misconduct arises from interactions that we should consider private."


            Is it news? Ansari story triggers media ethics debate

Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Is it news? Ansari story triggers media ethics debate

What makes a private sexual encounter newsworthy? A little-known website raised that very question after publishing an unidentified woman's vivid account of comedian Aziz Ansari's sexual advances while the two were on a date.

The story on Babe.net threw a wrench into the #MeToo movement, with some feminist writers dismissing the incident as a bad date that should have remained private. Others welcomed the piece for spurring a debate over deeper cultural attitudes that normalize aggressive behavior toward women.

Media ethics experts say it's not easy to determine what constitutes a legitimate story of sexual misconduct in the midst of a social movement that has emboldened people to speak out on subjects once considered taboo.

"What takes this out of the realm of a really bad date and into the realm of something that is publicly significant?" asked Ed Wasserman, dean of the journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley. "It's a little borderline."

  The story, which appeared Saturday, offers a detailed 3,000-word account of a night out between Ansari and a 23-year-old Brooklyn photographer that ended at the comedian's home. The woman told the site that the actor repeatedly initiated sexual activity despite what she later called "clear non-verbal cues" indicating her discomfort and lack of interest. She also reportedly told Ansari that she didn't want to "feel forced" in the encounter.

The woman told Babe.net that she eventually decided the incident was a sexual assault and said she was angered when she saw Ansari wearing a "Time's Up" pin at the Golden Globe Awards. The pin referred to a movement against sexual misconduct in Hollywood.

The website published screenshots of what it said were text messages between the two the next day. The woman told Ansari the encounter had made her uncomfortable; he texted back with an apology. The story was initially published with no comment from Ansari because, the website said, his representatives did not get back to them by its deadline.

Many major news organizations reacted cautiously. The Associated Press and other media outlets did not report on the story until Ansari issued a public statement addressing the claim the next day. The actor, who stars on the Netflix hit "Master of None," acknowledged that he apologized to a woman last year when she told him about her discomfort during a sexual encounter in his apartment that he believed to be consensual.

Feminist writers, other actors and media commentators were left to debate the public value of an anonymous tale about a confusing encounter at a time when more women are speaking publicly about sexual assault.

Some prominent women, including Whoopi Goldberg and Ashleigh Banfield, a host on the CNN spinoff HLN, concluded that the story didn't describe sexual misconduct of any kind and lacked newsworthiness. The feminist writer Jill Filipovic, in a column for The Guardian , said the piece touched on the need for more stories about "how pervasive power imbalances benefit men and make sex worse for women." But she said Babe.net squandered that opportunity by failing to "tell this particular story with the care it called for" and muddying the line between sexual assault and misogynistic behavior.  

The story's reporter and editors at Babe.net, which is less than two years old and says it has 3 million readers, have publicly defended their news judgment. "We stand by our story," said site editor Amanda Ross. Babe.net is published by Tab Media, a company that has received funding from Rupert Murdoch.

Helen Benedict, a Columbia journalism professor, said the story's one-sided, anonymous account was difficult to judge. But that, she said, encapsulates the tension between the public's need to know and the obligation of the media to protect sources, particularly people who say they are victims of sexual assault and request anonymity.

Benedict said the story didn't sufficiently press the woman on her motivations and took a flippant approach as to whether the incident constituted sexual assault. "I don't feel that the reporters asked enough about what the goal was," she said. "What does she want?"

Ryan Thomas, an assistant professor at the Missouri School of Journalism, said the piece lacked the rigor of other stories that used multiple sources to establish a clear pattern of abuse by prominent men like Harvey Weinstein and Louis C.K.

"Most of the journalism has been very methodical in identifying a catalog of incidents to build a picture of a pattern of behavior," Thomas said. By contrast, he said, the Babe.net story "focuses on a single case against a named individual by an anonymous individual," thus raising questions about its newsworthiness and the care with which it was reported.

Few have called into question the veracity of the report, particularly because Ansari himself did not dispute it.

Wasserman, the Berkeley professor, said he finds it difficult to criticize the piece for crossing any lines of journalistic integrity. After wrestling with the question of whether the article addressed an issue of legitimate public concern, he said, he "reluctantly" sided with Babe.net.

"Is this news? It really does come out of an area of activity that is normally considered to be pretty private," he said. "But on balance, the entire question of sexual misconduct arises from interactions that we should consider private."

Dale Earnhardt Jr. crashes into tree after helping car stuck in snow

It could be said that former NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. has some of the best driving skills ever, having made a living out of going more than 200 miles an hour on some of our country’s toughest racetracks.

Yet, with snow involved, Earnhardt got into some trouble while trying to help other people stuck in the weather.

>> Read more trending news 

“(North Carolina) stay off the roads today/tonight. Five minutes after helping these folks I center punched a pine tree,” Dale shared on his Twitter page on Wednesday shortly after stopping to help some stranded travelers on the road. “All good. Probably just needs a new alignment,” he added.

Fans were were thankful Earnhardt was OK, but the tweet didn’t come without some NASCAR jokes. 

“Jr. did you attempt to turn right? Gets ya every time,” one Twitter user said.

Earnhardt’s accident comes a day after the former NASCAR driver, voted the sport’s most popular driver for 15 consecutive years, announced the day before that he would be covering the Winter Olympics and the Super Bowl in the coming weeks as part of his new deal as a contributor to NBC Sports.

Unfortunately, Dale Jr. was not the only driver to find himself in harm’s way thanks to the snow, as NASCAR driver Daniel Suarez found himself stuck in the snow on the side of the road in his sports car Wednesday.

Michael Waltrip decided to drive in snowy conditions in North Carolina, and appeared to do so safely in his Ford and later in his Toyota Tundra.

Driver Kevin Harvick thought better of it, making the decision to stay in and enjoy the snow off the main roads.

Ann Curry speaks out about Matt Lauer sexual harassment allegations in new interview

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Ann Curry speaks out about Matt Lauer sexual harassment allegations in new interview

Ann Curry has remained tight-lipped since the news broke of Matt Lauer’s alleged sexual misconduct, but she spoke about the scandal on “CBS This Morning.”

The 61-year-old journalist and producer appeared on the program Wednesday to discuss her new PBS docuseries “We’ll Meet Again” and she was asked to speak on the scandal surrounding her disgraced former co-anchor. Curry admitted that she was “not surprised” by the scandal.

>> Read more trending news 

“Do you believe that Matt Lauer abused his power?” asked Norah O’Donnell.

“You know, I’m trying to do no harm in these conversations. I can tell you that I am not surprised by the allegations,” Curry responded. When asked to explain further, Curry struggled to articulate her response.

“That means that … see, now, I’m walking down that road. I’m trying not to hurt people, and I know what it’s like to be publicly humiliated. I never did anything wrong to be publicly humiliated, and I don’t want to cause that kind of pain to somebody else,” Curry said. “But I can say that, because you’re asking me a very direct question, I can say that I would be surprised if many women did not understand that there was a climate of verbal harassment that existed. I think it would be surprising if someone said that they didn’t see that.”

She continued, “It was verbal sexual harassment,” before being cut off.

When Curry left NBC’s “Today” in June 2012, it was widely speculated that Lauer was the catalyst for her exit. A fan favorite, it came as a surprise to audiences when Curry broke the news of her exit amid tears, as she was considered one of the top stars at NBC and could have been poised to take over a bigger role on the show. The unexpected departure is likely the public humiliation she was referring to.

Related: Matt Lauer fired over allegations of inappropriate workplace behavior

The Emmy award winner also spoke with People as part of her press tour for her upcoming show. She discussed the aftermath of being pushed off “Today.”

“It hurt like hell,” she told the publication. “It hurt so much, but I learned a lot about myself. I can say I’ve done nothing wrong. I’ve been honest and true. I’ve tried to stay pure. I’ve tried to not respond in a knee-jerk manner, and I’ve stayed very close to who I am. So it hurt, but I’m also proud of myself.”

“CBS This Morning” dealt with its own scandal when co-anchor Charlie Rose was fired in November for allegedly making “unwanted sexual advances” towards several women, including, “lewd phone calls, walking around naked in their presence or groping their breasts, buttocks or genital areas.”

Related: Charlie Rose fired from CBS amid sexual harassment allegations; PBS cuts ties with newsman

Anchors Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell denounced their former co-anchor over the accusations.

“It takes a lot of courage for these women to come forward, and I think that they should continue to do so,” O’Donnell said on the broadcast following the news. “This is a moment that demands a frank and honest assessment about where we stand and more generally the safety of women. Let me be very clear: There is no excuse for this alleged behavior. It is systematic and pervasive, and I’ve been doing a lot of listening, and I’m going to continue to do that.”

Ellen Pompeo returning to ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ for two more seasons, earning $20 million

Meredith Grey is here to stay at Grey Sloan Memorial Hospital — for at least two more seasons.

Deadline reported that the star of “Grey’s Anatomy,” Ellen Pompeo, has signed on to continue her role for another two years. She’ll also be permanently adding the title of “producer” to her credits on the series, while also being bumped to executive producer on the forthcoming firefighter spinoff series.

>> Read more trending news 

In addition to growing her resume, Pompeo stands to rake in $575,000 per episode, which comes to $20 million a year, making her the highest-paid actress on a primetime TV drama. The show already holds the title of ABC’s highest-rated series.

Pompeo’s pay wasn’t a given, however. Like many women, she had to fight to be paid adequately, particularly compared to her male counterparts.

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter published Wednesday, the actress said she’s now comfortable asking to be paid what she’s worth.

“I’m 48 now, so I’ve finally gotten to the place where I’m OK asking for what I deserve, which is something that comes only with age,” Pompeo said.

“For me, Patrick (Dempsey) leaving the show (in 2015) was a defining moment, deal-wise. They could always use him as leverage against me: ‘We don’t need you; we have Patrick,’ which they did for years. I don’t know if they also did that to him, because he and I never discussed our deals. There were many times where I reached out about joining together to negotiate, but he was never interested in that. At one point, I asked for $5,000 more than him just on principle, because the show is ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ and I'm Meredith Grey. They wouldn’t give it to me. And I could have walked away, so why didn’t I? It’s my show; I’m the No. 1. I’m sure I felt what a lot of these other actresses feel: ‘Why should I walk away from a great part because of a guy?’You feel conflicted but then you figure, ‘I’m not going to let a guy drive me out of my own house.’”

Pompeo said that once series creator Shonda Rhimes became more successful and had more control, it brushed off on her and allowed her to have more say in her own career.

“ (Shonda) got to a place where she was so empowered that she was generous with her power. Now, what did that look like? It looked like her letting me be the highest-paid woman on television, letting me be a producer on this show, letting me be a co-executive producer on the spinoff and signing off on the deal that the studio gave me, which is unprecedented.”

While Pompeo is excited to keep the show going, she makes no promises about when it will eventually end.

“I’ve been saying since season one, ‘We have two more years.’ This show, it’s taking on a life of its own, and who knows? We take it season by season,really,” she told Deadline.

Pompeo added, “You never think TV shows are going to go this long. Of course not, never, and especially me, I don’t ever assume things like that. I assume tomorrow everyone’s going to hate us. You got to try. You got to stay humble.”

“I’m extremely proud of the show and everyone that has worked on it in the past, everybody who’s here now,” she said, sharing that she’ll definitely let her children — Stella, 8; Sienna, 3; and Eli, 1, with husband Chris Ivery — watch when they’re old enough.

“It’s the beginning of a movement, and it’s so special to me for so many reasons. So I certainly hope they watch every episode twice,”  Pompeo said.


            Group pushes lawsuit saying book infringes on artist's work

AP Photo/Keith Ridler, File

Group pushes lawsuit saying book infringes on artist's work

A group that preserves and promotes the work of a deaf, self-taught Idaho artist whose creations appear in museums around the world is fighting an attempt to dismiss its copyright infringement lawsuit against an Oregon children's book author.

The Boise, Idaho-based James Castle Collection and Archive said in documents filed Tuesday in federal court that Allen Say's book "Silent Days, Silent Dreams" steals images created by Castle, who died in 1977, and that its lawsuit should be allowed to move forward.

About 28 of the 150 illustrations in the children's book, described in the opening pages as a work of fiction about Castle, are Say's copies of the artist's work. The lawsuit filed in October seeks up to $150,000 for each allegation of copyright infringement.

A federal judge that month denied the group's request to temporarily halt book sales until the lawsuit plays out. U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill, who described the book as a "fictional biography," said it is not likely to infringe on Castle's work because it falls within fair legal use for purposes such as teaching or scholarship.

Say and publisher Scholastic Inc. asked last month that the lawsuit be dismissed.

The James Castle Collection and Archive responded Tuesday that the book does not fall within fair legal use because it doesn't add something new or transformative to Castle's work.

"Say's use of Castle's work gives the original no new expression, no new meaning and no new message," the group says, noting that the book is for commercial gain.

Scholastic Inc. spokeswoman Anne Sparkman said Wednesday that the company doesn't comment on pending litigation.

Castle was born deaf in 1899 in southwestern Idaho and was never able to speak or write. But he created thousands of works of art using various materials, including soot and his own spit.

The 80-year-old Say, who lives in Portland, Oregon, won the Caldecott Medal in 1994 for what judges said was the best American picture book for children.

His book is written from the perspective of Castle's fictional nephew. In the author's note, Say said he used soot and spit and other at-hand materials available to Castle to "emulate his unschooled style."

Bruce DeLaney, co-owner of Rediscovered Books in Boise, said Say's title has been a steady seller but not a best-seller despite being about a local artist. He said that might be because the James Castle Collection doesn't back the book.

"If there was a James Castle book that they were excited about, it would sell a lot better here in the valley because they have a lot of influence," he said.


            'The Situation' to plead guilty to tax-related charges

AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File

'The Situation' to plead guilty to tax-related charges

Former "Jersey Shore" reality TV star Mike "The Situation" Sorrentino wrote to a judge that he will plead guilty this week to federal tax charges, apparently ending a more than three-year legal odyssey.

In the letter filed to the court on Wednesday, Sorrentino's attorneys said he and his brother, Marc, plan to plead guilty on Friday in Newark.

Michael Sorrentino's lawyer didn't comment Wednesday on what charges to which his client would plead guilty.

The brothers were charged in September 2014 with filing bogus tax returns on nearly $9 million in income. The seven-count indictment alleged the Sorrentinos earned that amount between 2010 and 2012, mostly through two companies they controlled, MPS Entertainment and Situation Nation.

They allegedly filed false documents that understated the income from the businesses as well as their personal income. Michael Sorrentino also was charged with failing to file taxes for 2011, a year in which he earned nearly $2 million.

The brothers also spent millions of dollars on personal expenses they claimed were for business in 2012, according to the indictment.

Both brothers were charged with one count of conspiracy to defraud the United States, which is punishable by a maximum potential prison sentence of five years upon conviction. Both also faced counts of filing false returns, each of which carries a maximum three-year sentence.

The U.S. attorney's office filed additional charges last April. Michael Sorrentino was indicted on charges including tax evasion, structuring bank deposits to avoid reporting requirements and falsifying records. Marc Sorrentino was charged with falsifying records to obstruct a grand jury investigation

The Sorrentinos have been free on bail since they were charged.

"The Situation" appeared on all six seasons of the MTV reality show, which followed the lives of rowdy housemates in a New Jersey beach town. It ran from 2009 to 2012.

He isn't the only New Jersey reality TV star to run afoul of financial laws in recent years.

"Real Housewives of New Jersey" cast member Teresa Giudice and her husband Joe pleaded guilty in 2014 to bankruptcy fraud and submitting false loan applications to get $5 million in mortgages and construction loans. Joe Giudice also pleaded guilty to not paying about $200,000 in income taxes.

Teresa Giudice served nearly a year in prison and was freed in December 2015. Her husband is serving a 41-month sentence.


            Tomei, Arquette, Nash and Munn to present at SAG Awards

AP Photo

Tomei, Arquette, Nash and Munn to present at SAG Awards

Mandy Moore, Marisa Tomei, Olivia Munn and Rosanna Arquette will be among the presenters at Sunday's Screen Actors Guild Awards.

Niecy Nash, Gina Rodriguez, Maya Rudolph and SAG-AFTRA President Gabrielle Carteris are among the presenters announced Wednesday. The SAG Awards honor outstanding performances in television and film, with "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri" and "Big Little Lies" the leading nominees.

The show is one of the most reliable predictors of who will take home acting honors at the Academy Awards.

Halle Berry, Dakota Fanning, Lupita Nyong'o, Emma Stone and Kelly Marie Tran are also scheduled to present during Sunday's ceremony at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.

Kristen Bell will host the show, which for the first time in its 24-year history will feature a host.

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For full coverage of awards season, visit: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason


            Award may drop name of author tied to sterilization movement

AP Photo, File

Award may drop name of author tied to sterilization movement

The Vermont Board of Libraries has recommended changing the name of a children's book award that now honors a prominent Vermont author and activist accused of once supporting sterilizing people with severe mental and physical disabilities.

The board said it wants to remove the late Dorothy Canfield Fisher's name from the award to better match contemporary times and connect with young readers. The award, which was named after Fisher in 1957, honors excellence in children's literature.

The board's unanimous recommendation to the state librarian last week came after discussions about Fisher's association with the state's eugenics movement, which had been described as an attempt to deal with social and economic problems through sterilization and breeding in the 1920s and '30s.

Fisher, who wrote novels, nonfiction and short stories, was on a committee of the Vermont Commission on Country Life, which was linked to the eugenics movement.

In the 1930s, some Vermonters of mixed French Canadian and Native American heritage, as well as poor, rural whites, were placed on a state-sanctioned list of "mental defectives" and degenerates and sent to state institutions, such as the Home for the Feeble Minded in Brandon. Some had surgery after Vermont in 1931 became one of more than two dozen to pass a law that allowed for voluntary sterilizations for "human betterment."

Judy Dow is a descendant of one of the families targeted and a teacher of Native American culture. When she raised concerns about Fisher's association with the movement and her treatment of Native American and French Canadian characters in her writing, Fisher's 81-year-old granddaughter, Vivian Scott Hixson, balked.

"Many of the leaders of that movement were racists. Dorothy Canfield Fisher was not," Hixson, who has a Ph.D. in sociology and taught at Michigan State University, wrote to the board. "In fact, DCF combatted racism all her life."

Hixson, of East Lansing, Michigan, said Fishers' temporary support for "the sterilization of people with severe mental and physical handicaps" stopped in the early 1930s when Fisher's soon-to-be son-in-law — Hixson's father — and others convinced her otherwise. Hixson's father, John Paul Scott, was a genetics and psychology researcher.

"It's just unfortunate that people are looking for someone to attack," Hixson said.

Helene Lang, a former literature professor at the University of Vermont who has portrayed Fisher in living histories, also stood up to protect Fisher's name. She said Fisher's service on the committee did not mean she ever supported eugenics.

"My goal was to protect her because she was a woman who did a lot of good and was particularly the antithesis of the eugenics movement," Lang said Wednesday.

The name change recommendation should not be interpreted as an indictment of Fisher, said Bruce Post, chairman of the Board of Libraries.

"The Board was aware, to varying degrees, of the Vermont eugenics movement, but it felt that it was not the purview of the Board to involve itself in that larger issue," he said by email.

The board also recommended to the state librarian that the name of the award be reviewed every 15 years or sooner if appropriate. The state librarian did not return a phone call seeking comment.

Hixson said she understands the need to connect to the children of today and what they're reading.

"I have grandchildren," she said. "And their world is so different than the world that we grew up in."


            Domestic battery charge against 'Glee' actress dismissed

Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP, File

Domestic battery charge against 'Glee' actress dismissed

A domestic battery charge against an actress on the former hit show "Glee" has been dismissed in West Virginia.

WCHS-TV reports that the case against 30-year-old Naya Rivera ended after her husband decided not to seek prosecution.

An order was filed Friday in Kanawha County Magistrate Court.

The Kanawha County Sheriff's Office said Rivera was arrested Nov. 25 for domestic battery in Chesapeake after Ryan Keith Dorsey told a deputy that Rivera struck him in the head and face.

Agency spokesman Sgt. Brian Humphreys said the two were arguing over their child and Dorsey didn't require medical attention.

Rivera was released after being arraigned.

She is known for playing Santana Lopez on "Glee." Dorsey is also an actor and has appeared on shows including "Pitch" and "Nashville."


            London Zoo names okapi 'Meghan' to celebrate royal wedding

Zoological Society of London via AP

London Zoo names okapi 'Meghan' to celebrate royal wedding

London Zoo has honored Prince Harry's fiancee by naming its newborn okapi after her.

The zoo said Wednesday the animal born in early December was named Meghan to celebrate the upcoming wedding of Harry and American actress Meghan Markle.

The okapi (oh-COP-ee) have striped hindquarters like zebras but are related to giraffes. Native to the Democratic Republic of Congo, they sometimes are called a forest giraffe or zebra giraffe.

Zoo officials say the young mammal is doing well and that Meghan's mother, Oni, watches over her while she sleeps.

Zookeeper Gemma Metcalf said the birth is "a great opportunity to draw attention to the okapi, which is an extremely endangered species."

Harry and Markle's wedding is planned for May 19.


            Katie Couric returning for Winter Olympics opening ceremony

Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File

Katie Couric returning for Winter Olympics opening ceremony

NBC is bringing back Katie Couric to co-host the opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics next month in South Korea, and will live-stream the pomp for the first time.

Couric will work with Mike Tirico, who is replacing Bob Costas as prime-time host of the games, for the Feb. 9 ceremony.

The torch-lighting and parade of nations that begins every Olympics took on greater resonance Wednesday with the announcement that the rival Koreas will form their first unified Olympic team and march together in the ceremony.

"It's going to be really emotional for the athletes, for the crowd and for everybody sitting at home," said Jim Bell, executive producer of the Olympics for NBC.

The decision to live-stream the ceremony starting at 6 a.m. ET in the United States takes some critical heat off NBC. Some fans thought it odd that during the 2016 summer games in Brazil, NBC allowed every competition to be shown live online but not the opening ceremony. The live-stream will be available for free to cable subscribers.

The prime-time broadcast NBC will show on television will likely be edited for brevity.

Similarly, NBC will show its nightly Olympic prime-time broadcast that begins at 8 p.m. on the East Coast live across the country; given the time difference, there will be a lot of events taking place live during that time, daylight the next day in Korea. That means the West Coast "prime-time" broadcast will begin at 5 p.m.

The moves are a further recognition by NBC of the difficulty in showing tape-delayed events at a time the audience accustomed to seeing things when they want to.

Hoda Kotb would have been a natural pick to host the opening ceremony, but Bell said he didn't want to burden her when she just got the new lead job at "Today." So, instead, he called Couric, the former "Today" host who handled Olympic ceremonies in 2000, 2002, 2004 with Costas.

She joked at a news conference Wednesday that she and Tirico "go way back, to 45 minutes ago."

NBC also said that it had hired Joshua Cooper Ramo, a co-chief executive of the Kissinger Associates consulting firm and an Asian expert, to provide analysis during the games.

The thaw in relations between North and South Korea — however temporary — adds an intriguing element to an Olympics that has had little advanced buzz. NBC's most promotable American stars going in are Lindsey Vonn and Shaun White, two veteran athletes hoping for a last hurrah in Pyeongchang.

It means NBC is braced for a dip in its prime-time ratings, something that might be expected anyway because live television viewership in general is down from four years ago.

"I hope not," said NBC Sports Chairman Mark Lazarus. "But I just think media gravity takes us that way."

Instead, NBC is intent on convincing its advertisers that even if prime-time television viewing is off, that more people will consume Olympics content on cable, online and through venues like Snapchat, he said.


            U2, Elton John, Kendrick Lamar to perform at Grammys

Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File

U2, Elton John, Kendrick Lamar to perform at Grammys

U2 and Elton John are headed to the Grammys to help the organization celebrate its 60th awards show.

The Recording Academy announced Wednesday that U2 and John, who will sing one of his classics with Miley Cyrus, will perform at the Jan. 28 show at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Sam Smith and Kendrick Lamar, who is up for seven Grammys, were also added to the lineup. Previously announced performers include Bruno Mars, Cardi B, Pink, SZA, Lady Gaga, Little Big Town, Childish Gambino, Daddy Yankee, Luis Fonsi, Kesha, Alessia Cara, Khalid, Logic, Patti LuPone and Ben Platt.

Two days after the Grammys, the academy will hold "Elton John: I'm Still Standing — A GRAMMY Salute," where Smith, Cyrus and others will pay tribute to the Rocket Man.

The week leading up to the Grammys will also feature some high profile performers: Eminem, Dave Matthews and Childish Gambino are part of the "Citi Sound Vault" from Jan. 24-28 at Irving Plaza in New York City.

Thirty Seconds to Mars will kick it off on Jan. 24, followed by The National, Eminem, Gambino and Matthews with bandmate Tim Reynolds.


            Curry says she wasn't surprised by Lauer allegations

Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File

Curry says she wasn't surprised by Lauer allegations

Former "Today" show anchor Ann Curry said Wednesday that the atmosphere of verbal sexual harassment when she worked at the morning show left her not surprised by the allegations that got former colleague Matt Lauer fired.

Meanwhile, the show she left behind named a new executive producer for its first two hours, making women the hands-on supervisors for all four hours of "Today."

Curry resurrected some unpleasant memories for "Today" with an interview at competitor "CBS This Morning." She's promoting a new PBS show. Curry offered no specific examples of harassment or wrongdoing associated with Lauer, who was fired in November for an inappropriate relationship with a colleague that began in 2014.

"I would be surprised if many women did not understand that there was a climate of verbal harassment that existed," Curry said, later amending that to add the word "sexual."

She said the world is "waking up to a reality, an injustice that has been occurring for some time.

"I think it will continue until the glass ceiling is finally broken," she said. "This is about power, a power imbalance where women are not valued as much as men."

NBC News and Jim Bell, executive producer of "Today" during Curry's tenure as anchor, declined comment. Curry lost her job after less than two years as Lauer's co-anchor in 2012, and her tearful farewell was a low point that contributed to ABC's "Good Morning America" ending NBC's long-time reign at the top of the morning ratings. She left NBC in 2015.

Many viewers blamed Lauer for Curry's unceremonious exit. When asked if she believed he was behind her firing, Curry said that "I'm not the one to ask."

"You're the only one to ask," said CBS' Gayle King.

"I don't know what was all behind it," Curry said. "I do know that it hurt like hell. It wasn't a fun moment. I've learned a great deal about myself. I've really at this point let it go."

NBC's announcement that Libby Leist is replacing Don Nash as executive producer for the first two hours of "Today" comes two weeks after NBC appointed Hoda Kotb as Lauer's replacement, working alongside Savannah Guthrie. The show has two women in its lead on-air roles for the first time in its history.

Nash has been with "Today" for 30 years, as executive producer of the first two hours since 2012. He said he's leaving to spend more time with his family; behind-the-scenes leadership changes are not uncommon when anchors change at shows.

Leist, the new boss for the 7 to 9 a.m. hours at "Today," joined NBC in Washington in 2001, and has been a senior producer at "Today" for five years. She joins Jackie Levin, who oversees Megyn Kelly's "Today" hour at 9 a.m., and Tammy Filler, executive producer of the 10 a.m. hour. NBC News President Noah Oppenheim is the executive with overall oversight of the show.

Curry saluted Kotb's appointment to a job she once held.

"Many of the viewers of the morning broadcast are now women," she said. "It's overwhelmingly women. And so the idea that women are involved, speaking to women is actually an overdue idea."

Since Kotb began filling in for Lauer at the end of November, "Today" has won every week in the ratings to eclipse "Good Morning America." With the publicity boost and viewership sampling that usually accompanies the Olympics, NBC has the chance to turn what seemed like a disastrous story in Lauer's firing into the turnaround point for a real change in the morning pecking order. Morning shows are the most lucrative properties for television news divisions, so that means more than bragging rights.


            'The Last Jedi,' 'Three Billboards' among AARP nominees

Merrick Morton/Fox Searchlight via AP

'The Last Jedi,' 'Three Billboards' among AARP nominees

"Star Wars: The Last Jedi" hasn't been mentioned much in this year's awards season, but it's among the nominees for AARP The Magazine's 17th annual Movies for Grownups Awards.

Oscar contenders are also in the mix. Besides "The Last Jedi," nominees for best film include "Get Out," ''Lady Bird," ''The Shape of Water" and "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri."

Best-actress nominees are Meryl Streep, Annette Bening, Judi Dench, Salma Hayek and Frances McDormand; best-actor nominees are Denzel Washington, Steve Carell, Daniel Day-Lewis, Gary Oldman and Tom Hanks.

There will also be trophies for best-supporting actor and actress, director and ensemble cast, and for categories like best "grown-up love story."

Helen Mirren will receive a career achievement award.

The Feb. 5 ceremony will be held in Los Angeles. It will air on PBS' "Great Performances" on Feb. 23.

___

Online:

www.aarp.org/moviesforgrownups

___

For full coverage of awards season, visit: https://apnews.com/tag/AwardsSeason


            Lebanon reverses move to ban Spielberg's 'The Post'

AP Photo/Bilal Hussein

Lebanon reverses move to ban Spielberg's 'The Post'

Lebanese authorities have reversed a decision to ban Steven Spielberg's newspaper drama "The Post" ahead of its opening in theaters across the country, a local cinema manager said Wednesday.

Lebanese censorship authorities had recommended the ban because the director is blacklisted by the Arab League over his support for Israel. After two months of marketing the film, theaters had taken the posters down and rolled back plans for a premiere.

Isaac Fahed, sales and distribution manager of the Grand Cinemas chain, one of Lebanon's largest, said the film will open in theaters on Thursday after "mediation" between the distributor and the Interior Ministry. He declined to elaborate.

Lebanese officials could not immediately be reached for comment.

Censorship authorities had recommended the ban, which required the interior minister's approval. The reversal of the ban is unusual. Lebanon is technically at war with Israel, and the movement to boycott Israel enjoys wide support in the country.

Fahed said the reversal was good news for the cultural scene in Lebanon as well as the boycott movement.

"It is not a commercial film and not an action film," Fahed said, adding that they were not expecting it to be a box office hit. "It is (good) for freedom of cinema and culture and for being fair and just in our defense against Israel and Zionism. There is an efficient way, not a stone age way.

"We are at war with the Israeli government, not with Jewish people or their ideology," he said.

Lebanon officially follows an Arab League blacklist against supporters of Israel and organizations and companies seen as promoting or doing business with the country. A leaked U.S. State Department memo from 2007 revealed that Spielberg was blacklisted by the League for donating $1 million to Israel for reconstruction during its 2006 war with Lebanon.

"The Post" is being shown in other Arab countries, where there have been no calls to boycott it.

The film, starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, tells the story of the Washington Post's efforts to publish the Pentagon Papers, classified documents that revealed the failures of the U.S. war in Vietnam.


            Stella McCartney hopes fashion can have a 'Me Too' moment

Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

Stella McCartney hopes fashion can have a 'Me Too' moment

Designer Stella McCartney is ready to see the Me Too movement sweeping Hollywood make its way to the runways.

"It's about time the fashion industry spoke up a little more," said McCartney during an interview Tuesday at a Los Angeles concert event showcasing her autumn collection.

"We are nearly 80 percent women in the company, but I also like men. So I'm a big believer in equality," said the British designer, who wore black to support the sexual misconduct defense initiative Time's Up.

Katy Perry, Christina Aguilera, Emma Roberts, Kate Hudson and Goldie Hawn were among the starry guest list.

"She just gives me the pallet and I paint with it and tonight I'm red!" said Perry while making her way into the party wearing a ruffled, flowy frock.

It was a family affair with Paul McCartney walking the red carpet before performing for the fashionable crowd.

The elder McCartney told reporters he was "super proud" of daughter Stella and joked that she got her sense of style from his former Beatles bandmate, Ringo Starr, who was also in attendance.

McCartney joined the band Muse onstage for Beatles' hits like "I Saw Her Standing There" and "Helter Skelter." Other performers included St. Vincent and Beck featuring the Compton Kidz Club choir.

Models were perched around the event space accentuating the rock concert setting with faded denim, funky animal prints and cozy sweaters. A neon Time's Up sign welcomed guests to Hollywood's S.I.R. Studios.

Sheer French lace showed up on slinky pastel slip dresses, sleeves and tracksuits. Leopard print ran throughout and a cinched-waist jumpsuit mixed red chevron with stripes. McCartney's men's line included preppy polo shirts and V-neck sweaters matched with patterned overcoats and relaxed track pants or jeans.

"It's approachable," said McCartney of the collection. "Naturally confident, naturally sexy and modern."

___

Follow Nicole Evatt on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NicoleEvatt


            Stapleton, Arcade Fire, Modest Mouse lead Forecastle lineup

Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File

Stapleton, Arcade Fire, Modest Mouse lead Forecastle lineup

Chris Stapleton, Arcade Fire and Modest Mouse lead the lineup for the Forecastle Festival in Louisville, Kentucky, along with Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit, Houndmouth and The War on Drugs.

The July 13-15 music festival held on Waterfront Park on the banks of the Ohio River is in its 16th year. Weekend passes go on sale on Friday, Jan. 19.

Additional artists include Father John Misty, Vance Joy, Courtney Barnett, NF, Jimmy Eat World, Kurt Vile and the Violators, Louis the Child and T-Pain.


            50 shows, 5 days: Fashion says

AP Photo/Christophe Ena

50 shows, 5 days: Fashion says "bonjour" to Paris menswear

The traveling fashion press bid "ciao" to Milan and said "bonjour" to Paris on Wednesday as another week of menswear mania that will include 50 shows, endless parties and million-dollar deals got underway in the French capital.

Powerhouse Valentino unveiled its couture-infused fall-winter creations from designer Pierpaolo Piccioli on Day 1, which also featured collections by lesser-known houses such as Julien David and Facetasm.

Here are the some highlights:

VALENTINO'S ARISTOPUNK

The message from Piccioli's accomplished menswear show was simple: All rich kids should have a dose of rebellion.

The now-solo Valentino designer, whose designs have gone from strength to strength, channeled the concept of "Aristopunk."

With delicious contrast, white sneakers graced the luxuriant carpets inside the magnificent, 18th century-style Hotel Salomon de Rothschild. This was served up with bubble jackets in white and black and high zipped collars as acid yellow, neon pink and vivid blue added a dash of bold fun.

But there was much artistry at work, too, in the 48 dark, masculine and generally fitted looks. The beauty was captured best in the dandy-like swagger produced by a billowing shin-length coat style.

Panels separated the lower segments and as the models walked by, they fluttered stylishly like weighty, hanging petals.

___

"STRANGER THINGS" ACTOR STEPS OUT

Twenty five-year-old Joe Keery shot to fame as Steve Harrington in the hit American science-fiction horror TV series, "Stranger Things."

And now he's hit the fashion circuit.

Decked out in a sartorial-sportswear black Valentino jacket, the actor and musician seemed to enjoy the moment, chatting animatedly to front row guests, whom also included actor Mark Ruffalo.

Keery confirmed this was indeed his fashion show debut. "This is my first one of these, so I'm just dipping my toes in," he told AP. "I've no idea. I'm just going along for the ride."

Keery, who also starred in the Jessica Chastain movie "Molly's Game," said he's still yet to see the hit film, and called being chosen for the role of a trust fund kid "a surprise."

___

JULIEN DAVID'S DOG-EAT-DOG WORLD

That fashion is a dog-eat-dog world was perhaps the message from French designer Julien David, whose models for fall-winter previews all donned comic canine masks.

The looks — featuring huskies, Dalmatians, poodles and bulldogs — endowed David's 22 designs with a sense of surreal fun and dog-style relaxation. The models posed during Wednesday's 'show' sitting on chairs next to tables decorated with cards games and dominos, or slouched on a couch, as fashion insiders chuckled and snapped their cameras.

It was clever stage-managing by David, one of the rising stars in Paris menswear, to highlight his signature casual style. His clothes — baggy denims with turn-ups that revealed pulled-up wooly socks and white-laced sneakers — were just that.

Dungarees in deep indigo were worn over a utilitarian golden brown toggle sweater, and lined boots had big eyelets — riffs in Paris on the workmen styles that have been ubiquitous on the Milan runway shows.

___

CHRISTOPHE LEMAIRE EVOKES A MASCULINE AIR

Wearable, fashion-forward and minimalist. That's the successful mantra employed by former-Hermes designer Christophe Lemaire and it was used with aplomb for his stylish fall-winter show brimming with clean lines and loose silhouettes.

There were nods to the utilitarian trend with boots, buttons, big flat pockets and boxy workers' jackets. And a strong masculine air was evoked, in this 40-piece collection, thanks to its autumnal color palette of smoke, slate gray, black, drab and golden brown.

Lemaire's clever use of round shoulders and soft fabrics evoked comfort and ensured that the hardy elements of his designs were never overpowering. Sometimes they almost fused into the gentle mottled-paint decor.

A flash of white — in baggy pants — may well have reflected the fall sky's occasional fluffy cloud.

___

FACETASM DELIVERS CONTRASTS

Facetasm took the on-trend worker style as its starting point for a fall-winter collection that was ultimately hard to pin down.

Japanese-style thick denim fabric was given a great scrunched-up effect in a round-shouldered bomber with oversize proportions and baggy jeans. It was twinned with a black hoodie, which had a raw street-wear vibe that resonated with the show's warehouse venue and its wrought-iron columns.

The Tokyo-founded company has won plaudits for its conceptual styles with hints of punk — but Wednesday's show sometimes lacked focus.

Oversized garments, one of the show's major themes, were delivered with a dark palette that was cut with occasional bold colors — acid green, neon blue, lemon yellow or bright red. Several designs — like a big pale blue winter coat — riffed on the '80s.

The name of the house was based on its founder Hiromichi Ochiai's idea of the varying angular sides of a diamond — angles that seem contrasting that yet produce an inner harmony. Their show Wednesday was highly creative but could have done with less of the contrasts and more of the harmony.

___

Thomas Adamson can be followed at Twitter.com/ThomasAdamson_K

Eagles guitarist Glenn Frey's widow files wrongful death lawsuit against New York hospital

The widow of late Eagles guitarist Glenn Frey is suing the New York City hospital that treated her husband before his death in 2016.

According to Reuters, Cindy Frey filed a lawsuit Tuesday accusing Mount Sinai Hospital and gastroenterologist Steven Itzkowitz of negligence while treating the musician, who had ulcerative colitis, in late 2015.

>> Read more trending news 

The wrongful death lawsuit alleges that "Frey was rendered sick, sore, lame and disabled" because Itzkowitz and the hospital did not properly diagnose, treat or disclose the risks of treatment to him, Reuters reported.

Frey died Jan. 18, 2016, after suffering "complications from rheumatoid arthritis, acute ulcerative colitis and pneumonia," the band said in a statement at the time. He was 67.

Eagles manager Irving Azoff previously told The Wrap that rheumatoid arthritis medications were partly to blame for Frey's death.

“The colitis and pneumonia were side effects from all the meds,” Azoff said

Cindy Frey is seeking "unspecified damages," Reuters reported.

Read more here.


            France to loan Britain famed 11th-century Bayeux Tapestry

Bayeux city hall

France to loan Britain famed 11th-century Bayeux Tapestry

French officials plan to loan the historic Bayeux Tapestry to Britain, allowing the 11th-century artwork depicting the conquest of England to leave France for the first time in centuries.

The mayor of the Normandy town of Bayeux, Patrick Gomont, said Wednesday that the loan is about five years away because restoration work is required to ensure the fragile 70-meter (230-foot) cloth isn't damaged in transit. It currently resides in a museum in the town.

The Times of London newspaper reported that French President Emmanuel Macron will announce the loan of the artwork on Thursday when he meets British Prime Minister Theresa May for talks on Brexit, security and border issues.

The tapestry is a both a treasured work of medieval art and a valuable historical document that depicts the events leading up to the Norman conquest of England by William the Conqueror in 1066. It last left Normandy during World War II, when it was moved to Paris.

Conservative British lawmaker Tom Tugendhat, who heads Parliament's Foreign Affairs Committee, said the loan was a "fantastic gesture of goodwill" by France.

Levi Roach, a medieval historian at the University of Exeter, said the tapestry was a symbol of the "close yet fraught" relationship between Britain in France. Its loan is especially resonant as Britain prepares to leave the European Union and strike up new relationships with its European neighbors.

"It is very significant that the Bayeux Tapestry is going to be coming to the United Kingdom and that people are going to be able to see this," May told lawmakers in the House of Commons.

May's spokesman would not comment on whether Britain planned to loan France anything in return.

The venue where the tapestry will be displayed in Britain hasn't been announced. The director of the British Museum said he would be "honored and delighted" to put it on show.

"This would be a major loan, probably the most significant ever from France to the U.K.," museum director Hartwig Fischer said.

The tapestry depicts the invasion from the victorious French standpoint, but many historians believe it was stitched in England.

Chrissy Teigen offers to pay McKayla Maroney's possible $100K fine to speak out about team doctor

One after one, gymnasts and other victims of former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar, 54, stepped forward in a Michigan courtroom Tuesday to recount the sexual abuse and emotional trauma they say he inflicted on them as children.

U.S. Olympians Simone Biles, Aly Raisman and Gabby Douglas are among the many women to accuse Nassar of abuse.

>> Read more trending news 

Nearly 100 victims are expected to address the court during the four-day sentencing hearing. 

However, former gold medalist McKayla Maroney may not speak out.

In December 2016, Maroney signed a confidential settlement with the group that trains U.S. Olympic gymnasts to keep allegations that she was sexually abused by Nassar a secret.

The settlement included nondisclosure and non-disparagement clauses and Maroney or her parents could be sued for more than $100,000 for violating the agreement. The suit seeks to invalidate those provisions under a California law that prohibits settlements in civil cases that could result in criminal sex offense charges.

Chrissy Teigen, who is from Snohomish, Washington, is offering to pay Maroney's possible fine so Maroney can speak out against Nassar. 

On Tuesday, Teigen tweeted the following about the fine:

"The entire principle of this should be fought – an NDA to stay quiet about this serial monster with over 140 accusers, but I would be absolutely honored to pay this fine for you, McKayla."

Maroney said Nassar's abuse started in her early teens and continued for the rest of her competitive career.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

 

What is bitcoin? What you need to know about cryptocurrency

If you own bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, it might be a bad day for you.

The price of bitcoin plunged by 15 percent Tuesday morning, dropping below $12,000 for the first time since Dec. 4. Other cryptocurrencies have also seen price declines, with Ethereum falling by 20 percent and Ripple falling by 33 percent. The plunging prices are a stark difference to the success bitcoin saw last month — hitting a record of nearly $20,000 on Dec. 16.

>> On DaytonDailyNews.com: Currency of the future? Some argue it’s bitcoin

As the digital currency bitcoin surges in popularity, curious investors and entrepreneurs alike are watching closely to see what happens with the fluctuating prices. Don’t understand the basics of bitcoin? Here’s what you need to know:

What is bitcoin?

Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency, or a digital token, that can be sent electronically and directly from peer to peer. There is no physical backing and it is a decentralized currency — meaning it is not controlled by any government or banking entity. Bitcoin is the first cryptocurrency ever created, and remains the most popular one to date.

“I tell people it’s a digital currency and it’s a program,” said Jad Mubaslat, Wright State University graduate student and founder of BitQuick.co, a bitcoin trading platform. “For the first time in history, it allows anyone anywhere in the world to send any amount of money instantly. Most importantly, it’s without a third party … like a bank or a government. Now, you can truly send your money without somebody telling you what you can or cannot do.”

>> On MyDaytonDailyNews.com: I bought bitcoin. Here’s what I learned

The record of all bitcoin exchanges and transactions are on what is called the blockchain, which is a network of decentralized computers.

How was bitcoin created?

Bitcoin was created by a programmer going by the name Satoshi Nakamoto in 2008. He communicated only through email and social messaging, and no one truly knows Nakamoto’s identity. He released the software globally in 2009, and now anyone can use and download it.

How do you buy bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies?

In the U.S., several websites have popped up where you can buy and sell bitcoin online. One of the most popular websites is Coinbase and others include Mubaslat’s BitQuick.coCoindesk.com and bitcoin.com. Investors can also meet with other bitcoin users in person and trade bitcoin via their virtual wallets on their phones. After meeting another bitcoin user through websites like Craigslist or LocalBitcoin.com, a user simply scans a QR code with another person’s wallet to transfer bitcoin.

Some people prefer to buy bitcoin in person or through a bitcoin ATM because the bitcoin transfer over faster than when they buy it online — it can take up to seven days, and sometimes longer, for bitcoin to show up in a virtual wallet after purchasing it online.

Why do some criminals use cryptocurrency for illegal transactions?

Some criminals use bitcoin because users can open a wallet to send and receive bitcoin without giving a name or identity. There is no bank or central authority, like a government, to control this information. Bitcoin also became a popular method for making ransom payments when a computer system is taken over by ransomware.

>> On DaytonDailyNews.com: How criminals use bitcoin illegally

However, bitcoin is not completely anonymous and transactions can be traced by police through bitcoin trading websites. Other untraceable cryptocurrencies, like Monero, are becoming popular for dark web uses including drug trafficking and human trafficking.

How is the worth of bitcoin decided?

The price — and ultimate worth — of bitcoin fluctuates, and experts are calling the cryptocurrency extremely volatile. The price is determined by open-market bidding on Bitcoin exchanges. The worth of bitcoin could be compared to the way that gold prices fluctuate — in the sense that gold has value because people believe it does.

What exactly is bitcoin mining?

Mining is the process that creates new bitcoins in the blockchain, or network of computers. The bitcoin miners race to process new transactions, and the fastest computers get a chunk of new bitcoin. A miner wins the race about every 10 minutes, which will happen until there are 21 million bitcoins in the world. No new bitcoins will be created after the blockchain has 21 million, which is expected to happen in 2140.

Anyone can set their computer up to mine bitcoin, but programmers with specialized hardware are usually the only ones to win bitcoin now.

Are there any other cryptocurrencies as popular as bitcoin?

Other cryptocurrencies also exist, but bitcoin is the most popular one right now. Other popular cryptocurrency includes Ethereum, Bitcoin Cash, Ripple, Litecoin and Monero. Digital cryptocurrencies are being created for all types of uses like the legal marijuana industry and adult entertainment and sex worker industries.

>> Read more trending news 

What are the legal uses of bitcoin?

Most transactions on the bitcoin network aren’t illegal — it’s typically people buying and selling bitcoin to each other. People in countries with high inflation or unstable governments are putting their money into bitcoin to avoid losing their savings. It’s also used to transfer large sums of money internationally. It is quicker to transfer bitcoin than it is to go through a bank transfer, which can take weeks.

Some businesses also accept bitcoin, including Overstock.com, Wikipedia, backpage.com and Square. For a short time, a franchise of Firehouse Subs in Cincinnati accepted bitcoin. The restaurant, in Clifton, shut down a few years ago. “Firehouse Subs didn’t do very many transactions in bitcoin, but it has generated buzz around the shop,” the Cincinnati Business Courier wrote.

 

            More actors expressing regret about working with Woody Allen

Photos by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

More actors expressing regret about working with Woody Allen

A growing number of actors are distancing themselves from Woody Allen and his next film, heightening questions about the future of the prolific 82-year-old filmmaker in a Hollywood newly sensitive to allegations of sexual misconduct.

Timothee Chalamet on Tuesday said he will donate his salary for an upcoming Woody Allen film to three charities fighting sexual harassment and abuse: Time's Up, the LGBT Center in New York and RAINN. The breakout star of "Call Me By Your Name" announced on Instagram that he didn't want to profit from his work on Allen's "A Rainy Day in New York," which wrapped shooting in the fall.

"I want to be worthy of standing shoulder to shoulder with the brave artists who are fighting for all people to be treated with the respect and dignity they deserve," said Chalamet.

Chalamet is just the latest cast member of an Allen production to express regret or guilt about being professionally associated with the director. In recent weeks, Rebecca Hall ("A Rainy Day in New York," ''Vicky Cristina Barcelona"), Mira Sorvino ("Mighty Aphrodite"), Ellen Page ("To Rome With Love"), David Krumholtz ("Wonder Wheel") and Griffith Newman ("A Rainy Day in New York") have all in some way distanced themselves from Allen or vowed that they wouldn't work with him again.

Dylan Farrow, Allen's adopted daughter, in 2014 renewed the claim that Allen molested her in an attic in 1992 when she was seven. Allen, who has long denied the allegations, was investigated for the incident but not charged.

The rising chorus of actors renouncing Allen suggests the road ahead for the him may be particularly challenging, even for a director whose personal controversies have for decades made him an alternatively beloved and reviled figure in movies. Financial support for the filmmaker has not previously waned in part because of the eagerness many stars have for working with a cinematic legend. But fielding a starry cast may prove increasingly difficult for Allen in a movie industry in the midst of a "Me Too" reckoning.

"If I had known then what I know now, I would not have acted in the film," Greta Gerwig, who co-starred in Allen's 2012 comedy "To Rome With Love," told The New York Times last week . "I have not worked for him again, and I will not work for him again. Dylan Farrow's two different pieces made me realize that I increased another woman's pain, and I was heartbroken by that realization."

New remarks by Farrow were aired Wednesday as a prelude to what "CBS This Morning" calls her first on-camera discussion of the issue.

"Why shouldn't I want to bring him down?" she said in response to a question. "Why shouldn't I be angry? Why shouldn't I be hurt? Why shouldn't I feel some sort of outrage ... after all these years, being ignored and disbelieved, and tossed aside?"

Asked why she hopes people will believe her now, she replied, "I suppose that's on them. All I can do is speak my truth."

Farrow has previously questioned why the "Me Too" movement hasn't ensnarled Allen. In an op-ed published last month in The Los Angeles Times , she wrote: "Why is it that Harvey Weinstein and other accuseelebrities have been cast out by Hollywood, while Allen recently secured a multimillion-dollar distribution deal with Amazon, greenlit by former Amazon Studios executive Roy Price before he was suspended over sexual misconduct allegations?"

Price, the former head of Amazon Studios, resigned in October following an allegation that he had sexually harassed television producer Isa Hackett while she was working on the Amazon series "The Man in the High Castle."

"A Rainy Day in New York" is the fourth project for Allen with Amazon, which bet heavily on the filmmaker to help establish its film production arm as a home to auteur filmmakers. It reportedly spent $80 million to lure Allen into television to make the 2016 series "Crisis in Six Scenes."

Amazon, which didn't respond to queries Tuesday, also distributed Allen's "Cafe Society" in 2016 and "Wonder Wheel," which opened December 1. It has grossed a mere $1.4 million domestically on an estimated budget of $25 million but had more success overseas, grossing $7.8 million.

"A Rainy Day in New York," a romantic comedy due out sometime this year, also stars Selena Gomez, Jude Law, Liev Schreiber and Elle Fanning. In his statement, Chalamet tellingly noted that due to "contractual obligations" he couldn't comment on the long-standing allegations against Allen.

The announcement by Chalamet, a favorite Oscar contender for best actor this year, followed a similar one Friday by his co-star Hall. She said she was donating her salary from the film to Time's Up, the recently formed initiative to combat gender inequality in the entertainment industry. "It's a small gesture and not one intended as close to compensation," Hall wrote on Instagram.

Some have continued to publicly support Allen, though, including Alec Baldwin.

"Woody Allen was investigated forensically by two states (NY and CT) and no charges were filed," Baldwin said Tuesday on Twitter. "The renunciation of him and his work, no doubt, has some purpose. But it's unfair and sad to me. I worked with Woody Allen three times and it was one of the privileges of my career."


            The Latest: Angela Lansbury, 92, schools young actors

Photo by Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

The Latest: Angela Lansbury, 92, schools young actors

The Latest on upcoming programming from the TV Critics meeting in Pasadena, California (all times local):

5:46 p.m.

Angela Lansbury has words of wisdom for young actors.

Lansbury, 92, who plays crusty Aunt March in PBS' new adaptation of "Little Women," advised newcomers to learn everything they can about a character to avoid just spouting words.

Actors who fail to approach their work thoughtfully will end up "a flash in the pan," Lansbury said.

"It's terribly important to get out of yourself and into that character. Leave yourself at home," she told a TV critics meeting Tuesday.

The two-part adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's classic novel, debuting May 13 on PBS' "Masterpiece" showcase, stars Maya Hawke, daughter of Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman, in her screen debut. She plays aspiring writer Jo March.

Hawke called it a "huge gift and a huge honor" to work with Lansbury and Emily Watson, who plays Jo's mother, Marmee.

___

11:28 a.m.

PBS will air a five-part series about the sexual misconduct crisis.

PBS chief executive Paula Kerger said Tuesday will address the burst of attention to the issue and how it can be used to produce "positive and lasting change."

"#MeToo, Now What?" will be hosted by Zainab Salbi, founder of Women for Women International, a humanitarian organization. The debut date is Feb. 2.

PBS said the series will include reporting and conversations on topics including how race and class figure into the issue. Studio guests will include men and women from across the country, along with activists, and leaders from media, business and other sectors.

The Me Too unity movement was triggered by allegations of sexual misconduct against prominent men including Harvey Weinstein.


            Box office top 20: 'Jumanji' hits No. 1 again

Niko Tavernise/20th Century Fox via AP

Box office top 20: 'Jumanji' hits No. 1 again

After finishing second behind "Star Wars: The Last Jedi" for two weeks, "Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle" notched its second straight weekend atop the North American box office, taking in $35.2 million over the four-day Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend, according to final figures Tuesday.

Steven Spielberg's Pentagon Papers drama "The Post" took in $23.1 million in its nationwide launch, while the Liam Neeson thriller "The Commuter" opened with $15.8 million.

The Taraji P. Henson hit "Proud Mary" debuted with $11.7 million. And the sequel "Paddington 2," bowed with $15 million. Warner Bros. purchased the North American distribution rights for the Paddington Bear sequel from The Weinstein Co. last November.

The top 20 movies at U.S. and Canadian theaters Friday through Tuesday, followed by distribution studio, gross, number of theater locations, average receipts per location, total gross and number of weeks in release, as compiled Tuesday by comScore:

1. "Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle," Sony, $35,176,695, 3,849 locations, $7,301 average, $291,312,604, 4 Weeks.

2. "The Post," 20th Century Fox, $23,055,654, 2,819 locations, $6,868 average, $27,544,891, 4 Weeks.

3. "The Greatest Showman," 20th Century Fox, $16,177,587, 2,938 locations, $4,244 average, $98,931,455, 4 Weeks.

4. "The Commuter," Lionsgate, $15,795,899, 2,892 locations, $4,738 average, $15,795,899, 1 Week.

5. "Paddington 2," Warner Bros., $15,003,359, 3,702 locations, $2,972 average, $15,003,359, 1 Week.

6. "Star Wars: The Last Jedi," Disney, $14,627,721, 3,090 locations, $3,836 average, $594,902,305, 5 Weeks.

7. "Insidious: The Last Key," Universal, $14,353,765, 3,150 locations, $3,943 average, $50,594,905, 2 Weeks.

8. "Proud Mary," Sony, $11,701,440, 2,125 locations, $4,687 average, $11,701,440, 1 Week.

9. "Pitch Perfect 3," Universal, $7,326,950, 2,505 locations, $2,393 average, $96,326,175, 4 Weeks.

10. "Darkest Hour," Focus Features, $5,415,720, 1,693 locations, $2,636 average, $36,631,272, 8 Weeks.

11. "Ferdinand," 20th Century Fox, $4,863,022, 2,154 locations, $1,638 average, $76,891,116, 5 Weeks.

12. "Coco," Disney, $4,618,538, 1,362 locations, $2,446 average, $198,161,978, 8 Weeks.

13. "Molly's Game," STX Entertainment, $4,618,479, 1,708 locations, $2,267 average, $21,447,576, 3 Weeks.

14. "I, Tonya," Neon Rated, $4,068,388, 517 locations, $6,504 average, $10,767,207, 6 Weeks.

15. "The Shape of Water," Fox Searchlight, $3,450,402, 723 locations, $3,921 average, $27,172,294, 7 Weeks.

16. "Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri," Fox Searchlight, $3,075,421, 1,022 locations, $2,464 average, $29,283,880, 10 Weeks.

17. "Lady Bird," A24, $2,157,666, 652 locations, $2,712 average, $37,373,875, 11 Weeks.

18. "Wonder," Lionsgate, $1,627,928, 970 locations, $1,248 average, $129,016,502, 9 Weeks.

19. "All the Money in the World," Sony, $1,484,807, 1,408 locations, $869 average, $23,310,867, 3 Weeks.

20. "Phantom Thread," Focus Features, $1,391,276, 62 locations, $18,513 average, $2,473,054, 3 Weeks.

At least 4 Olympians won’t accept invitation to White House

Mike Stobe

At least 4 Olympians won’t accept invitation to White House

Controversy has hit the Winter Olympics before the torch has been lit in South Korea, as four U.S. Olympians — plus one “furious” ice skater who didn’t end up making the cut — preempted a White House invite from President Donald Trump by turning it down.

>> Read more trending news

Skiers Gus Kenworthy and Lindsey Vonn, and figure skaters Nathan Chen and Adam Rippon have all said publicly that they will not accept a White House invite from the president in the event that they receive one.

Figure skater Ashley Wagner said the same, but she didn’t make Team USA.

Kenworthy and Rippon, who are both openly gay, said that they do not support Trump’s policies and do not want to appear that they do by visiting the White House.

“I am very proud to represent the U.S. but I don’t stand by Trump and his cabinet and their policies,” Kenworthy said. ”I do not want to feign approval for policies that are in place and things that are being pushed at the moment, by going. If I was invited I would decline my spot.”

Rippon said that he felt it is his “duty” not to go.

“Athletes are given a really special platform. It’s our duty, as athletes, to be role models. I won’t go to the White House,” Rippon told the BBC. “I won’t go because I don’t think somebody like me would be welcome there. I know what it’s like to go into a room and feel like you’re not wanted there.”

USA Today reported that Nathan Chen and Ashley Wagner would also decline an invite. In Wagner’s case, it is moot since she did not qualify for Team USA.

Wagner notably missed out on an Olympic appearance, said that she was “furious” about the decision-making by the judges and that she believed that she wasn’t treated fairly.

“I’m furious. I am absolutely furious. I know when I go and I lay it down, and I absolutely left one jump on the table. But for me to put out two programs that I did at this competition, as solid as I skated, and to get those scores, I am furious, and I think deservedly so,” she said. “I am absolutely OK with [judges] being strict on my [jump] rotations […] but you know it needs to be across the board. I don’t necessarily feel like it’s been that way at this event, so we’ll see how things pan out.”

The U.S. Figure Skating selection committee responded that the judges “absolutely made the right call.”

Wagner later changed her tune.

Lindsey Vonn said as early as the beginning of December that she hoped to “represent the people of the United States, not the president.”

When asked if she would accept an invite she replied “Absolutely not.”


            Matt Damon apologizes for comments on sexual misconduct

Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File

Matt Damon apologizes for comments on sexual misconduct

Matt Damon says the backlash for his comments on sexual misconduct was actually very helpful.

A few weeks ago, Damon told The Associated Press and other outlets that there were varying degrees of misconduct and the punishment should reflect that. But he was criticized by some, including ex-girlfriend Minnie Driver.

In an interview with the AP on Tuesday, Damon says he wishes he had listened more before offering his thoughts, and that he "doesn't want to further anybody's pain."

He says he's sorry and adds that the feedback on his comments have been "very helpful."

He adds that he supports the Time's Up organization Hollywood women founded to combat sexual harassment nationwide.

Dave Matthews Band returns with new album, summer tour

Mike Coppola/Getty Images for DirecTV

Dave Matthews Band returns with new album, summer tour

Last year, the Dave Matthews Band took a rare hiatus from the road.

This summer, the band will embark on an extensive North American tour May through September, according to a Monday announcement on the band’s official website.

>> Read more trending news 

Tickets will go on sale at 10 a.m. Feb. 2 on livenation.com.

The band is also prepping the release of a new studio album, its first since 2012’s “Away From the World.” Every online ticket order for the, tour purchased by May 17 will include a choice of CD or digital download of the new album, the name of which has not been announced, upon its release.

Members of the DMB Warehouse Fan Association can participate in a ticket pre-sale now at warehouse.davematthewsband.com. As well, Citi cardholders can purchase pre-sale tickets beginning at 10 a.m. Jan. 30 through 10 p.m. Feb. 1 through the Citi Private Pass program.

Dates for the tour are below. More information can be found on the DMB website.

5/18 in The Woodlands, Texas, at Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion presented by Huntsman

5/19 in Dallas, at Starplex Pavilion

5/22 in Austin, Texas, at Austin360 Amphitheater

5/26 in Atlanta at Cellairis Amphitheatre at Lakewood

5/27 Orange Beach, Alabama, at The Wharf Amphitheater

5/29 Brandon, Mississippi, Brandon Amphitheater

5/30 Rogers, Arkansas, Walmart AMP – Arkansas Music Pavilion

6/1 Burgettstown, Pennsylvania, KeyBank Pavilion

6/2 Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Blossom Music Center

6/5 Syracuse, New York, Lakeview Amphitheater

6/6 Clarkston, Michigan, DTE Energy Music Theatre

6/7 Cincinnati, Riverbend Music Center

6/9 Bristow, Virginia, Jiffy Lube Live

6/12 Gilford, New Hamphire, Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion

6/13 Gilford, New Hamphire, Bank of New Hampshire Pavilion

6/15 Camden, New Jersey, BB&T Pavilion

6/16 Camden, NJ BB&T Pavilion

6/22 Mansfield, MA Xfinity Center

6/23 Hartford, Connecticut, Xfinity Theatre

6/27 Darien Center, New York, Darien Lake Amphitheater

6/29 Chicago, Huntington Bank Pavilion

6/30 Chicago, Huntington Bank Pavilion

7/1 Milwaukee, Wisconsin American Family Insurance Amphitheater

7/6 Noblesville, Indiana, Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center

7/7 Noblesville, IN Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center

7/10 Toronto, Budweiser Stage

7/11 Ottawa, ON Ottawa Bluesfest

7/13 Saratoga Springs, New York, Saratoga Performing Arts Center

7/14 Saratoga Springs, New York, Saratoga Performing Arts Center

7/17 Wantagh, New York, Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater

7/18 Holmdel, New Jersey, PNC Bank Arts Center

7/20 Raleigh, North Carolina, Coastal Credit Union Park at Walnut Creek

7/21 Virginia Beach, Virginia, Veterans United Home Loans Amphitheater at Virginia Beach

7/24 Charlotte, North Carolina, PNC Music Pavilion – Charlotte

7/25 Tampa, Florida, MIDFLORIDA Credit Union Amphitheatre

7/27 West Palm Beach, Florida, Coral Sky Amphitheatre at the S. Florida Fairgrounds

7/28 West Palm Beach, Florida, Coral Sky Amphitheatre at the S. Florida Fairgrounds

8/24 Englewood, Colorado, Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre

8/25 Englewood, Colorado, Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre

8/28 Bend, Oregon, Les Schwab Amphitheater

8/31 George, Washington, Gorge Amphitheatre

9/1 George, Washington, Gorge Amphitheatre

9/2 George, Washington, Gorge Amphitheatre

9/7 Stateline, Nevada, Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena at Harveys

9/8 Mountain View, Califonia, Shoreline Amphitheatre at Mountain View

9/10 Los Angeles, Hollywood Bowl

Enrique Iglesias, Anna Kournikova share photos of newborn twins

Enrique Iglesias is taking a break from his ulta-private life to share the first photo of one of his twins with the world, and so is his rumored wife, retired tennis star Anna Kournikova.

>> Read more trending news 

E! News reported that the singer, who welcomed twins with Kournikova in December, shared the first photo of himself snuggling one of the babies on social media on Instagram with the caption, “My Sunshine.”

Kournivoca posted a similar photo an hour later on her Instagram page with the same caption. In the image, she cradles one of her babies in her hands and gives a kiss.

The couple kept Kournikova’s pregnancy a secret from the public for the duration until they welcomed the babies, a boy and a girl, late last year. According to TMZ, the twins were reportedly named Nicholas and Lucy.

Related: Enrique Iglesias and Anna Kournikova reportedly welcome twins

Iglesias and Kournikova started dating in 2001 when the retired tennis star appeared as his love interest in the music video for his hit single “Escape.”

Premiere date set for ‘Trading Spaces’ reboot despite allegations against Carter Oosterhouse

Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Premiere date set for ‘Trading Spaces’ reboot despite allegations against Carter Oosterhouse

Fans can enjoy new episodes of TLC’s revamped version of “Trading Spaces” starting this spring.

A new trailer for the latest iteration of the reality TV design show was announced Friday and included the April 7 premiere date for the program.

The trailer, on the Trading Spaces Facebook page, shows original host Paige Davis with designers Vern Yip, Hildi Santo-Tomas, Doug Wilson, Laurie Smith and Genevieve Gorder and carpenters Ty Pennington and Carter Oosterhouse.

New additions to the cast -- John Gidding, Kahi Lee, Sabrina Soto, Brett Tutor and Joanie Sprague -- are also featured. 

>> Read more trending news 

Us Weekly  reported that despite sexual assault allegations against Oosterhouse, TLC and “Trading Spaces” co-stars are sticking by the former model turned carpenter.

Former makeup artist Kailey Kaminsky said in a Dec. 14 interview with The Hollywood Reporter that Oosterhouse repeatedly coerced her into in sexual acts with him while on the set of his HGTV show “Carter Can” in 2008.

Related: TLC’s ‘Trading Spaces’ is headed back to television

“What I can tell you from my experience with Carter is that he is an absolute professional,” Davis said during the 2018 Winter Television Critics Association Press Tour Jan. 12. “I’ve never had any experience with him where I haven’t just had the best time ever. He’s down to earth. He’s very good at what he does. And I enjoyed working these episodes with him. And I’m really excited for them to air.” 

“Everything she just said, I reiterate,” Pennington said. “We know Carter as the Carter we know, and he’s a great guy.”

Related: Paige Davis, Ty Pennington, Vern Yip, others join ‘Trading Spaces’ revival

Yip also voiced support for Oosterhouse, saying, “From what I know of Carter, he is a decent human being. He is a solid person. He’s a loving husband. He’s a loving father. And I think we have to realize that it’s important to make sure that we listen to exactly what’s going on, and that we don’t throw somebody under the bus without first making sure that we understand the entire story and view it through the lens of the facts. That’s not me saying something is untrue or not true, but that’s just me saying that from what I know of Carter, he’s a good, good person.”

Nancy Daniels, president and general manager of TLC, said at the same event that the network is fine having the show continue with Oosterhouse.

“At the end of the day, we feel very comfortable continuing with Carter in the show,” she said, according to Variety.

“Trading Spaces” airs April 7 at 9 p.m. on TLC. Watch the trailer for the show’s return below.