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Southeastern Show House 2018

Child killed in wreck on I-285 in Fulton County

A 4-year-old was killed in a wreck involving two tractor trailers along I-285 Thursday afternoon.

Several people were inured in the crash involving two tractor-trailers and a car on I-285 near Washington Road, officials confirmed Thursday.

Lanes reopened shortly after 8 p.m., according to the Georgia Department of Transportation. 

The GSP is handling the investigation.

TRENDING STORIES:

Teens find body of teacher missing for 3 years, authorities say Judge allows Tex McIver jurors to take gun to SUV where shooting happened Security guard sexually assaulted at downtown library, police say

Child killed in wreck on I-285 in Fulton County

A 4-year-old was killed in a wreck involving two tractor trailers along I-285 Thursday afternoon.

Several people were inured in the crash involving two tractor-trailers and a car on I-285 near Washington Road, officials confirmed Thursday.

Lanes reopened shortly after 8 p.m., according to the Georgia Department of Transportation. 

The GSP is handling the investigation.

TRENDING STORIES:

Teens find body of teacher missing for 3 years, authorities say Judge allows Tex McIver jurors to take gun to SUV where shooting happened Security guard sexually assaulted at downtown library, police say

In Comey memos, Trump fixates on 'hookers,' frets over Flynn

WASHINGTON (AP) - In a series of startlingly candid conversations, President Donald Trump told former FBI Director James Comey that he had serious concerns about the judgment of a top adviser, asked about the possibility of jailing journalists and described a boast from Vladimir Putin about Russian prostitutes, according to Comey's notes of the talks obtained by The Associated Press on Thursday night.

The 15 pages of documents contain new details about a series of interactions with Trump that Comey found so unnerving that he chose to document them in writing. Those seven encounters in the weeks and months before Comey's May 2017 firing include a Trump Tower discussion about allegations involving Trump and prostitutes in Moscow; a White House dinner at which Comey says Trump asked him for his loyalty; and a private Oval Office discussion where the ex-FBI head says the president asked him to end an investigation into Michael Flynn, the former White House national security adviser.

The documents had been eagerly anticipated since their existence was first revealed last year, especially since Comey's interactions with Trump are a critical part of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into whether the president sought to obstruct justice. Late Thursday night, Trump tweeted that the memos "show clearly that there was NO COLLUSION and NO OBSTRUCTION."

The president also accused Comey of leaking classified information. The memos obtained by the AP were unclassified, though some portions were blacked out as classified. Details from Comey's memos reported in news stories last year appear to come from the unclassified portions.

In explaining the purpose of creating the memos, which have been provided to Mueller, Comey has said he "knew there might come a day when I would need a record of what had happened" to defend not only himself but the FBI as well.

The memos cover the first three months of the Trump administration, a period of upheaval marked by staff turnover, a cascade of damaging headlines and revelations of an FBI investigation into potential ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. The documents reflect Trump's uneasiness about that investigation, though not always in ways that Comey seemed to anticipate.

In a February 2017 conversation, for instance, Trump told Comey how Putin told him, "we have some of the most beautiful hookers in the world" even as the president adamantly, and repeatedly, distanced himself from a salacious allegation concerning him and prostitutes in Moscow, according to one memo.

In another memo, Comey recounts how Trump at a private White House dinner pointed his fingers at his head and complained that Flynn, his embattled national security adviser, "has serious judgment issues." The president blamed Flynn for failing to alert him promptly to a congratulatory call from a world leader, causing a delay for Trump in returning a message to an official whose name is redacted in the documents.

"I did not comment at any point during this topic and there was no mention or acknowledgment of any FBI interest in or contact with General Flynn," Comey wrote.

By that point, the FBI had already interviewed Flynn about his contacts with the Russian ambassador, Sergey Kislyak, and the Justice Department had already warned White House officials that they were concerned Flynn was vulnerable to blackmail.

Flynn was fired Feb. 13, 2017, after White House officials said he had misled them about his Russian contacts during the transition period by saying that he had not discussed sanctions. The following day, according to a separate memo, Comey says Trump cleared the Oval Office of other officials, encouraged him to let go of the investigation into Flynn and called him a good guy. Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and is now cooperating with Mueller's investigation.

The memos reveal that days before Flynn's firing, then-White House chief of staff Reince Priebus asked Comey if Flynn's communications were being monitored under a secret surveillance warrant.

"Do you have a FISA order on Mike Flynn?" Priebus asked Comey, according to the memos, referring to an order under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Comey said he "paused for a few seconds and then said that I would answer here, but that this illustrated the kind of question that had to be asked and answered through established channels."

Comey's response is redacted on the unclassified memos.

The memos also show Trump's continued distress at a dossier of allegations - compiled by an ex-British spy whose work was funded by the Democratic National Committee and the Clinton campaign - examining potential ties between him and his aides and the Kremlin. Comey writes how Trump repeatedly denied to him having been involved in an encounter with Russian prostitutes in a Moscow hotel.

"The President said 'the hookers thing' is nonsense," Comey writes, noting that Trump then related the conversation with Putin about the "most beautiful hookers." Comey says Trump did not say when Putin had made the comment.

The documents also include the president's musings about pursuing leakers and imprisoning journalists. They also provide insight into Comey's personal and professional opinions. He judges the administration's travel ban to be legally valid, and he takes a swipe at former Attorney General Loretta Lynch, calling her predecessor, Eric Holder, "smarter and more sophisticated and smoother."

The memos were provided to Congress earlier Thursday as House Republicans escalated criticism of the Justice Department, threatening to subpoena the documents and questioning officials.

In a letter sent to three Republican House committee chairmen Thursday evening, Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd wrote that the department was sending a classified version of the memos and an unclassified version. The department released Boyd's letter publicly but did not release the memos. The chairmen issued a statement late Thursday saying the memos show that Comey clearly never felt threatened, and Trump didn't obstruct justice.

Justice officials had allowed some lawmakers to view the memos but had never provided copies to Congress. Boyd wrote that the department had also provided the memos to several Senate committees.

Boyd wrote in the letter that the department "consulted the relevant parties" and concluded that releasing the memos would not adversely affect any ongoing investigations. Mueller is investigating potential ties between Russia and Trump's 2016 campaign as well as possible obstruction of justice by the president.

Comey is on a publicity tour to promote his new book, "A Higher Loyalty." He revealed last year that he had written the memos after conversations with Trump.

He said in an interview Thursday with CNN that he's "fine" with the Justice Department turning his memos over to Congress.

"I think what folks will see if they get to see the memos is I've been consistent since the very beginning, right after my encounters with President Trump, and I'm consistent in the book and tried to be transparent in the book as well," he said.

__

Associated Press writer Tom LoBianco contributed to this report.

__

Link to the memos:

http://apne.ws/dwhMe9R

HOA pushing back against signs telling drivers to slow down, neighbors say

A mother says her fight to protect her kids from speeders is facing pushback from her homeowner’s association.

The organization is threatening to fine her if she doesn’t take down signs telling people to slow down while driving down her street.

"And it's homeowners that live in here that are speeding through," homeowner Kerri Hitch told Channel 2’s Carl Willis .

Hitch said it's becoming more and more frequent for drivers to go 15 to 20 miles over the speed limit down her road, Hopewell Manor Driver in Forsyth County.

"It gets to the point that there's been verbal confrontations. We've had to call the sheriff's office out and request extra patrols," Hitch said.

TRENDING STORIES:

Teens find body of teacher missing for 3 years, authorities say Judge allows Tex McIver jurors to take gun to SUV where shooting happened Security guard sexually assaulted at downtown library, police say So, some homeowners in the neighborhood, including Hitch, took matters in their own hands and posted signs saying "drive like your kids live here" along the road. "We have noticed a big difference that people have started to slow down now," Hitch told Willis. But the Hopewell Manor Homeowners Association said the signs need to come down. Hitch asks, at what cost? Willis spoke with the HOA president and he said if residents want the signs to remain along the road, they'll have to take it to a vote and change the covenants, conditions and restrictions. Hitch said that change needs to happen. "Our standards were written by the developer that didn't live in our community, didn't have children that played in the community and I think it's time we update our standards,” Hitch said. The fines for having the signs up along the road would be $25 a day and retroactive. But the community's architectural committee has offered a compromise: Make the signs uniform and temporary. Some neighbors believe drivers need a permanent reminder to slow it down. "We don't want something to happen to one of our children in here," Hitch said.

HOA pushing back against signs telling drivers to slow down, neighbors say

A mother says her fight to protect her kids from speeders is facing pushback from her homeowner’s association.

The organization is threatening to fine her if she doesn’t take down signs telling people to slow down while driving down her street.

"And it's homeowners that live in here that are speeding through," homeowner Kerri Hitch told Channel 2’s Carl Willis .

Hitch said it's becoming more and more frequent for drivers to go 15 to 20 miles over the speed limit down her road, Hopewell Manor Driver in Forsyth County.

"It gets to the point that there's been verbal confrontations. We've had to call the sheriff's office out and request extra patrols," Hitch said.

TRENDING STORIES:

Teens find body of teacher missing for 3 years, authorities say Judge allows Tex McIver jurors to take gun to SUV where shooting happened Security guard sexually assaulted at downtown library, police say So, some homeowners in the neighborhood, including Hitch, took matters in their own hands and posted signs saying "drive like your kids live here" along the road. "We have noticed a big difference that people have started to slow down now," Hitch told Willis. But the Hopewell Manor Homeowners Association said the signs need to come down. Hitch asks, at what cost? Willis spoke with the HOA president and he said if residents want the signs to remain along the road, they'll have to take it to a vote and change the covenants, conditions and restrictions. Hitch said that change needs to happen. "Our standards were written by the developer that didn't live in our community, didn't have children that played in the community and I think it's time we update our standards,” Hitch said. The fines for having the signs up along the road would be $25 a day and retroactive. But the community's architectural committee has offered a compromise: Make the signs uniform and temporary. Some neighbors believe drivers need a permanent reminder to slow it down. "We don't want something to happen to one of our children in here," Hitch said.

Uber eats driver arrested, charged with sexually assaulting special needs man inside restaurant

Police say they've caught an Uber Eats driver who sexually assaulted a mentally disabled man.

Channel 2's Nefertiti Jaquez first broke this story three weeks ago when Channel 2 Action News learned about the airport arrest that brought the suspect to justice.

The alleged incident happened March 25 at No Mas Cantina on Walker Street. 

The victim's father says his 21-year-old son has autism and has the mental capacity of a 14-year-old. He asked us not to reveal his identity for this report.

While relieved, the victim’s father is still heartbroken and angry. 

“I don’t understand why. You’re an older guy. You’re old enough to know right from wrong. And for you to do that to a kid," he said. 

TRENDING STORIES:

2 KSU football players off the team after arrests for gambling, armed robbery Authorities find body of teacher missing for 3 years Student drop-offs could be delayed 60-90 minutes after DeKalb bus drivers call out

Atlanta police say Todd Barron, 54, attacked the victim in a bathroom while he was working at the downtown Mexican restaurant.

“No Mas Cantina was helpful in providing us video footage and everything and from there we were able to determine who the suspect was,” Lt. Andrea Webster with the Atlanta Police Department told Jaquez. 

They were able to quickly identity Barron because on the morning of March 25, the Uber Eats driver was at the restaurant to pick up a delivery order.

Detectives say the suspect fled to California for three weeks before returning to the metro area. 

They tracked him down when they realized he booked a flight back into Atlanta. They arrested him last week at the airport. 

We reached out to Uber and they released this statement:

“What’s been described is extremely disturbing and we are appalled. The delivery partner does not have access to the app and we stand ready to work with police on their investigation.” 

They also noted Barron had only been driving for the company since November.

Barron has been charged with aggravated sodomy and exploitation of a disabled adult.  

 

Uber eats driver arrested, charged with sexually assaulting special needs man inside restaurant

Police say they've caught an Uber Eats driver who sexually assaulted a mentally disabled man.

Channel 2's Nefertiti Jaquez first broke this story three weeks ago when Channel 2 Action News learned about the airport arrest that brought the suspect to justice.

The alleged incident happened March 25 at No Mas Cantina on Walker Street. 

The victim's father says his 21-year-old son has autism and has the mental capacity of a 14-year-old. He asked us not to reveal his identity for this report.

While relieved, the victim’s father is still heartbroken and angry. 

“I don’t understand why. You’re an older guy. You’re old enough to know right from wrong. And for you to do that to a kid," he said. 

TRENDING STORIES:

2 KSU football players off the team after arrests for gambling, armed robbery Authorities find body of teacher missing for 3 years Student drop-offs could be delayed 60-90 minutes after DeKalb bus drivers call out

Atlanta police say Todd Barron, 54, attacked the victim in a bathroom while he was working at the downtown Mexican restaurant.

“No Mas Cantina was helpful in providing us video footage and everything and from there we were able to determine who the suspect was,” Lt. Andrea Webster with the Atlanta Police Department told Jaquez. 

They were able to quickly identity Barron because on the morning of March 25, the Uber Eats driver was at the restaurant to pick up a delivery order.

Detectives say the suspect fled to California for three weeks before returning to the metro area. 

They tracked him down when they realized he booked a flight back into Atlanta. They arrested him last week at the airport. 

We reached out to Uber and they released this statement:

“What’s been described is extremely disturbing and we are appalled. The delivery partner does not have access to the app and we stand ready to work with police on their investigation.” 

They also noted Barron had only been driving for the company since November.

Barron has been charged with aggravated sodomy and exploitation of a disabled adult.  

 

Largest road project in state's history expected to be completed this summer, officials say

The largest road project in state history is just about finished.

Officials with the Georgia Department of Transportation told Channel 2 Action News the Northwest Corridor Express Lanes project should wrap up by late summer.

“This is a unique project for us," said Stephen Lively, one of the project managers. "We’re really excited to deliver such a large scale project to the traveling public.”

The 30 miles of reversible express lanes stretch down parts of I-575 in Cherokee County and I-75 in Cobb County before ending at the I-285 interchange near SunTrust Park.

TRENDING STORIES:

2 KSU football players off the team after arrests for gambling, armed robbery Authorities find body of teacher missing for 3 years Student drop-offs could be delayed 60-90 minutes after DeKalb bus drivers call out The lanes will open for drivers heading south in the morning and then to the north for the afternoon rush. "Having that reversible option means we can give drivers going south in the morning a more reliable trip time and those who are coming home in the afternoon,” said Natalie Dale, a GDOT spokesperson. Despite all the rain and snow over the past six months, GDOT says they were able to keep the project on track. "You do account for many weather days, things like snowstorms, things like a rainy season, so you account for those within the project schedule,” said Dale. While most of the work is already complete, GDOT says crews are still racing to finish elevated portions of the expressway near the I-285 interchange. “Structures are almost complete for the project,” said Lively. When they eventually open in September, all of the lanes will be toll lanes, which require drivers to have a Peach Pass.

Largest road project in state's history expected to be completed this summer, officials say

The largest road project in state history is just about finished.

Officials with the Georgia Department of Transportation told Channel 2 Action News the Northwest Corridor Express Lanes project should wrap up by late summer.

“This is a unique project for us," said Stephen Lively, one of the project managers. "We’re really excited to deliver such a large scale project to the traveling public.”

The 30 miles of reversible express lanes stretch down parts of I-575 in Cherokee County and I-75 in Cobb County before ending at the I-285 interchange near SunTrust Park.

TRENDING STORIES:

2 KSU football players off the team after arrests for gambling, armed robbery Authorities find body of teacher missing for 3 years Student drop-offs could be delayed 60-90 minutes after DeKalb bus drivers call out The lanes will open for drivers heading south in the morning and then to the north for the afternoon rush. "Having that reversible option means we can give drivers going south in the morning a more reliable trip time and those who are coming home in the afternoon,” said Natalie Dale, a GDOT spokesperson. Despite all the rain and snow over the past six months, GDOT says they were able to keep the project on track. "You do account for many weather days, things like snowstorms, things like a rainy season, so you account for those within the project schedule,” said Dale. While most of the work is already complete, GDOT says crews are still racing to finish elevated portions of the expressway near the I-285 interchange. “Structures are almost complete for the project,” said Lively. When they eventually open in September, all of the lanes will be toll lanes, which require drivers to have a Peach Pass.
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